Felistowe Dockers

Felistowe Dockers

Tuesday, 30 June 2015

Port of Liverpool dockers turn down fresh pay offer at mass meeting











The entrance to the Port of Liverpool, Seaforth
The entrance to the Port of Liverpool, Seaforth

The rejection of a three-year pay deal and improvements to sick pay terms means the on-going strike ballot will continue


Dockers at the Port of Liverpool have this morning turned down a pay offer from their employer Blue Arrow at a mass meeting.
The rejection of a three-year pay deal and improvements to sick pay terms means that the on-going threat of strike action will continue.
The pay offer had been recommended by trade union Unite to its 195 Port of Liverpool workers last week, but more than 100 dockers turned it down by a show of hands at an early morning meeting at Seaforth. One docker who was there said there was a clear majority against accepting the offer.
The docker told the ECHO today that the proposed pay offer had been rejected because the workforce did not like the three-year duration of the deal.
Trade union leaders will now re-open discussions with the dockers’ employer Blue Arrow about further changes to the pay offer.
A spokesman for Unite said: “It did not meet our members’ expectations.”
Dockers have also previously said that a sticking point was the company’s plan to limit claims for sick pay to three weeks. Last week’s offer from Blue Arrow included paying sick pay for up to 12-weeks.
Unite is expected to announce the outcome of last week’s strike ballot later today.
Nobody from Blue Arrow was immediately available for comment.


The Smallest Port / Ferry At Felixstowe - Video


Unusual aerial views of Felixstowe Ferry, from the drone and camera of Mike Amos:



Triple-E Mette Maersk maiden call at Felixstowe, 29th June, 2015



The 2015 18,270 TEU Triple-E class Mette Maersk - making her st call, and maiden call, at the Port of Felixstowe on evening on 29th June, 2015
:


Shipping TV

Monday, 29 June 2015

MOL axes Europe-West Africa service after oil price plunge and volumes fall

Atlantic Voyager
After announcing its decision on Friday to withdraw from the Europe-West Africa trade, Japanese ocean carrier MOL said it would continue to serve the West African market from Asia.
This is despite the fact that this trade is also facing great challenges and suffered a 12% year-on-year volume decline in April.
Its last southbound vessel, the 2,600 teu Atlantic Voyager, is scheduled to depart Antwerp on August 3, with its final northbound sailing departing Tema on August 29.
“Our decision was inspired by the poor financial results of our Europe-West Africa service and the fact that, based on the present market outlook and cost exposure, conditions for an improvement of the results are not favourable,” the company said.
The sharp drop in in oil prices has hit the economies of African nations, such as Nigeria, that depend heavily on oil exports for revenue, and with commodity prices for iron ore, copper, rubber and cotton also plunging, a recent report by the World Bank predicted a “challenging year” for the continent.
According to the latest analysis from Drewry Maritime Research, the headhaul Asia-West Africa trade made a “stuttering start” to 2015, after recording healthy growth of 7% in 2014.
However, volumes shrank by 4% in the first four months of the year to approximately 410,000 teu.
Container Trade Statistics’ (CTS) data supplied to Drewry show that in April southbound trade volume was 12% down on the same month of 2014, at 107,000 teu. However, this was not nearly so bad as March, which saw a massive 29% year-on-year slump in the headhaul traffic.
In response to weakening demand on the route, carriers have slashed capacity southbound from 203,000 teu in February to 178,000 slots in April, said Drewry, by skipping a number of voyages.
The deteriorating demand picture has also forced container lines to reconsider their business strategy of upgrading the size of ships deployed on the trade.
According to Drewry data, although blanked sailings have helped to boost average ship utilisation levels on the southbound route – from just 45% in March to 60% in April – the capacity cull has failed to arrest the continual decline in spot rates, which plunged from almost $4,500 per 40 ft in May 2014, to less than $2,500 per 40 ft a year later.
On the major east-west shipping lanes this year, carriers have been largely unsuccessful in implementing general rate increases (GRI), and the Asia-West Africa market has brought equally bad times for ocean carriers.
Drewry noted that a $600 per teu GRI planned for June 1 had been postponed until July 1, but said it “was unlikely” it would be entirely successful, given that “very little has changed in the interim”.
This all seems a far cry from the TOC West Africa briefing held in Tenerife in December, when delegates expressed concern at the worsening levels of port congestion blighting the region and the ability of the container terminals to cope with the cascading of larger tonnage onto the trades.
Drewry’s analysis concluded: “The demand outlook for this trade has quickly deteriorated and is unlikely to reverse course in the short term.”





Southbound - Europe to West Africa

Ports of LoadingTangiersAlgecirasLondon GatewayHamburgAntwerp
Algeciras----468
Tangiers--1579
Dakar*59131514
Tincan1011151719
Tema1516202224
Abidjan1819232527

Northbound - West Africa to Europe

Ports of DischargeAntwerpHamburgLondon GatewayAlgecirasTangiers
Tangiers61214--
Abidjan1214162122
Tema1517192425
Tincan1820222728
Dakar2022242930



    ARN Port Rotation

    OriginETA/ETD
    Antwerp(Sun/Mon)
    Hamburg(Tue/Wed)
    London Gateway(Thu/Fri)
    Algeciras(Tue/Wed)
    Tangiers(Wed/Wed)
    Tincan(Sat/Wed)
    Tema(Thu/Sat)
    Abidjan(Sun/Tue)
    Antwerp(Sun)


    Friday, 26 June 2015



    MOL discontinuing participation in the Europe – West Africa Trade




    26 June, 2015


    Subject:  MOL discontinuing participation in the Europe – West Africa Trade


    Dear Valued Customer,

    It is with deep regret that we inform you that we have decided to discontinue our participation in the Europe – West Africa Trade. Our aforementioned decision is inspired by the poor financial results of our Europe - West Africa service and the fact that based on the present market outlook and cost exposure conditions for an improvement of the results are not favorable.

    Below you can find an overview of the final MOL Europe-West Africa sailings:

    Southbound
    ARN: Mv. Atlantic Voyager 012A
         ETD Antwerp, 3rd of August 2015

    ARX: Mv. Dimitris C  03181S
               ETD Antwerp, 31st of July 2015

    Northbound
    ARN: Mv. Atlantic Voyager 012B
               ETD Tema, 29th of August 2015

    ARX: Mv. Dimitris C  03281N
               ETD Abidjan, 22nd August 2015


    Our above decision does not do away with our commitment and believe in the West African market. Therefore we will continue with the development of our Asia-West Africa products and the development of the MOL organization within West Africa.

    We would like to thank you for your support and apologize for any inconvenience our decision may cause.

    If you have any questions do not hesitate to contact your local sales office. Contact details can be found on our website www.molpower.com.


    Yours faithfully,

    MOL Management

    Paul Branton ( Pickles ) Say's Goodbye To His Fellow Workers At Felixstowe



    Hi please would you be so kind to post a goodbye to all at Felixstowe Dock for me. My leaving happened very quickly so was unable to wish everyone well. Thank you Paul Branton aka Pickles


    Sunday, 28 June 2015

    NORTH SEA RO-RO, part 5: Arriving Felixstowe and onto the berth . .



    Here's the last of this series from Shipping TV - 5th and final part of our unique NORTH SEA RO-RO series, filmed aboard DFDS Seaways ferries Suecia Seaways and Selandia Seaways, operating between Felixstowe and Rotterdam. This time: into Felixstowe and onto the berth:

    Shipping TV

    Infographic: Global Berth Productivity


    An infographic released by the International Transport Forum (ITF) in its ‘Real Impacts of Mega-ships’ report shows the berth productivity of global ports in 2014.





    PTI previously reported on the turnaround times for various ports globally, with many Asian and European regions performing well, having turned around larger ships in 1-2 days.








    In the infographic, Panama and Mexico lead the way for berth productivity in the West, while Shanghai and Shenzhen dominate the East with peak productivity. These top performing parts of the world have been able to move between 120 and 167 containers per hour per ship.
    To read the ITF’s full report, click here




    Mega Containerships Kept Longer at Ports


    Port of Jebel AliPort of Jebel Ali
    Berth productivity on mega-container ships slipped in 2014 on a global basis, underscoring the continuing challenges that ports, terminals and container lines are facing in combating congestion and delays at major seaports around the world, according to US-based market analyst IHS Inc. 
    The number of total containers loaded, off-loaded and re-stowed per hour on mega-container ships of 13,000 TEUs and greater dipped to 116 in 2014 from 118 in 2012 and 2013, the company’s productivity data shows.
    The dip has been attributed to the lack of improvement in berth productivity keeping ships longer in port, forcing other vessels to wait at anchor, creating delays in the transfer of containers between feeder and line-haul ships, and forcing carriers to speed up — and burn more fuel — to maintain schedules.
    The issue of lengthy port stay times on the largest container ships is becoming a growing concern for container lines seeking to cut costs and operate efficiently, and for exporters experiencing chronic delays in their supply chains.
    Ports in Asia and the Middle East continue to achieve the highest productivity, IHS data shows.
    Globally, the United Arab Emirates’ port of Jebel Ali moved into the number one ranking, with 131 container moves per hour in 2014, up from 119 in 2013.
    China’s ports of Tianjin and Qingdao held their number two and three positions, with 127 and 126 average moves per hour, respectively.
    Among terminals, APM Terminals Yokohama and Tianjin Port Pacific International Container Terminal held their positions as numbers one and two while China’s Qingdao Qianwan Container Terminal moved up to number three, averaging 136 containers moved per ship, per hour.

    Saturday, 27 June 2015

    Containerised cat survives Cyprus to Felixstowe voyage without food, water


    • Cat became trapped after wandering inside shipping container in Cyprus
    • The stowaway, dubbed Miss Pickford, survived three-week journey to UK
    • She was discovered by warehouse staff as they unloaded in Bedfordshire
    • Miss Pickford is recovering from her journey and is looking for a new home
    A cat was discovered in a British warehouse after surviving a three-week journey in a shipping container without any food or water. 
    The stowaway tabby-and-white cat, who has since been dubbed Miss Pickford, became trapped after wandering into the crate as it was being loaded in the port of Limassol, Cyprus, in February.
    It remained in the sealed container as the vessel sailed to Felixstowe, Suffolk - stopping off in Haifa, Israel, Antwerp, Belgium, Bremerhaven, Germany and Rotterdam, the Netherlands on the way.
    Stowaway: The stowaway tabby-and-white cat, who has since been dubbed Miss Pickford, became trapped after wandering into the crate as it was being loaded at the port of Limassol, Cyprus, in February
    Stowaway: The stowaway tabby-and-white cat, who has since been dubbed Miss Pickford, became trapped after wandering into the crate as it was being loaded at the port of Limassol, Cyprus, in February
    The cat remained in the sealed container as the vessel sailed to Felixstowe, Suffolk - stopping off in Haifa, Israel, Antwerp, Belgium, Bremerhaven, Germany and Rotterdam, the Netherlands, on the way
    The cat remained in the sealed container as the vessel sailed to Felixstowe, Suffolk - stopping off in Haifa, Israel, Antwerp, Belgium, Bremerhaven, Germany and Rotterdam, the Netherlands, on the way
    The animal was discovered by staff from Pickfords, a removal and storage company, after they heard its meows as they unpacked the container at a warehouse in Kempston, Bedfordshire in March.
    The cat, who had made a bed for itself in one of the boxes, is believed to have survived by licking condensation from the walls. 
    The team at Pickfords phoned the local Bedford Trading Standards organisation who caught the cat and took it to Bayton Lodge Quarantine Kennels and Cattery in Bedworth, Warwickshire.
    Lorraine Grove, 58, the cattery's owner, said: 'When she arrived with us she was in a very bad condition. She was extremely thin, very dehydrated and her fur was dry like straw.'
    But Miss Pickford made a miraculous recovery during her quarantine period, and was given flea and worm treatment, rabies vaccination and a microchip.
    The four-year-old feline is now being cared for at Cats Protection's Birmingham Adoption Centre and is looking for a new home.
    Recovery: The cat is now being cared for at Cats Protection's Birmingham Adoption Centre, pictured
    Recovery: The cat is now being cared for at Cats Protection's Birmingham Adoption Centre, pictured
    Survival: The cat, who had made a bed for itself in one of the boxes, is believed to have survived by licking condensation from the walls. Above, file image of a shipping container
    Survival: The cat, who had made a bed for itself in one of the boxes, is believed to have survived by licking condensation from the walls. Above, file image of a shipping container
    Staff say she is still a little unsure of herself, but are confident that she'll make the perfect pet for someone.
    Sarah Whitmore, deputy manager at the centre, said: 'Miss Pickford is a very special cat to have survived such a gruelling ordeal.
    'She's fairly shy and retiring, so we're hoping to find her a quiet home with an experienced owner who can coax her out of her shell.'