Monday, 30 June 2014

Moving forward with automation


The ABB Group's cranes and harbour business is entering the delivery phase for the remote control crane order boom it received back in 2012.
In 2014 it will deliver remote controlled STS cranes to Maasvlakte 2 in Rotterdam, London Gateway, Long Beach and Dubai, all aimed at servicing the next generation of post-panamax vessels safely and efficiently.
Fred van den Hoonaard, group vice president, cranes and harbour business, ABB, told Port Strategy at the TOC Europe exhibition this week that the need to service larger vessels quickly and efficiently is driving innovation and development forward quickly.
“Automation is beginning to take ground because the industry is pushing technology forward step by step because of the need for better servicing and productivity,” Mr Hoonaard told PS.



Mr Hoonaard explained that the remote control side of the business is booming – customers are recognising that automation can not only increase productivity, but also improve safety by removing the human error factor and removing workers from the yard. Crane operators work away from the yard in a control room in the terminal building where the cranes can be overseen and monitored using onboard cameras.
Part of ABB’s crane and harbour division’s strategy is to help standardise the automation process at terminals and ports which it said will allow the new technology to be more readily accepted.
“Our vision is a controlled processed environment with standardised cranes, gate systems and remote control to take the automation concept even higher and produce a benchmark for productivity and efficiency at terminals," Mr Hoonaard said.



WATCH: Luxury Yacht Destroyed by Fire at San Diego Yard


Yacht fire
A 102-foot luxury yacht possibly worth $24 million has been completely destroyed after it caught fire while dry docked at a San Diego boat yard, and it was all caught on film.
According to local fire officials, the fire was reported at the at Marine Group Boat Works on the Chula Vista Bayfront at about 9:10 a.m. Thursday.
The yacht is reported to be the 102-foot “Polar Bear”. The owner of the vessel, who is from Minnesota, told local media that he cried when he first saw online video of his yacht completely engulfed in flames because, believe it or not, someone was actually able to get a GoPro up to shoot the fire.
Over 40 fire personnel responded, including help from the Coast Guard and San Diego Harbor Patrol, but intense smoke and flames coming from the vessel kept firefighting crews at bay for hours. Reports indicate that two people have been treated for smoke inhalation.
“Am I angry? No. Anger is not the right word,” said owner Larry Jodsass in a phone interview with local NBC 7. “It was my toy, my wonderful, beautiful piece of equipment. I think it’s the most beautiful boat that ever has been built.”
Jodsass added that the yacht took him five years to build and has been in the water for three. He said that the yacht is valued at $24 million.
The cause of the fire is under investigation, but reports say that a welder was working aboard the vessel at the time of the fire.
The incident follows the capsizing of a $10 million adventure yacht during launch at a Washington shipyard. Video of the vessel’s failed launch later went viral.
Located at the southern part of the San Diego Bay, Marine Group Boat Works specializes in refits, repairs and new construction of boats and super yachts up to 220 feet long. The yard is known for its 665-ton travelift, the largest on the U.S. west coast.


Sunday, 29 June 2014

New dispute adds to unrest in Norwegian ports



The ITF is stepping up support for affiliated dockers’ unions in Norway following a reported attempt by an employer to undermine them.

 Dockers in Mosjøen are in dispute over claims that their employer, Mosjøen Industri Terminal (MIT), a subcontractor at Alcoa's facility, has failed to pay money owed to them for their work and that they have been illegally locked out since early May.
Meanwhile an ongoing dispute in the port of Risavika is showing no sign of resolution. Workers there have been on strike for nine months over alleged attempts by employers to override International Labour Organization regulations that protect the status of dockers and subsequently restrict who can unload and load cargo. 


There have been a number of solidarity actions carried out in relation to this.
 
In response to the situation in Mosjøen the Norwegian Transport Workers' Union (NTF) has now subpoenaed MIT for the unpaid bills and illegal lockout and is expecting a court date in the coming weeks.

ITF president and dockers’ section chair Paddy Crumlin said: “We have been and will continue to support dockers in Norway. Whether it be in court or by way of international solidarity, we and dockers’ unions around the world will be right behind these workers as they deal with any attempts by employers to undermine their position as professionals with the right to secure, protected work for a decent wage."


Global logistics and DP World Southampton video


ITN recently came to the terminal to see why it ‘makes more sense’ to ship through Southampton when moving cargo in and out the UK.

Take note of the statement in this video at 2.12 from our ex Boss at Felixstowe



Saturday, 28 June 2014

A Look Back: MOL Comfort Incident Photos [25 PHOTOS]

On June 17, 2013, Mitsui O.S.K. Lines’ 2008-built MOL Comfort began suffering from severe hogging and broke in two while underway from Singapore to Jeddah with a load of 7,041 TEUs. The crew escaped in life rafts and were picked up by another merchant vessel. The stern section was never recovered and sank some 10 days later. The bow section was towed most of the way towards the Arabian Gulf, but eventually burst into flames and sank. Here is a collection of photos of the incident.
MOL Comfort on June 17, 2013.
FULL COVERAGE: MOL Comfort Incident
MOL Comfort breaks in two
MOL Comfort breaks in half, June 17, 2013.
Both fore and aft sections set adrift in the Indian Ocean. Image credit: MRCC
Image credit: MRCC
Bow section picture after breaking apart July 17. Image credit: MRCC Mumbai
Image credit: MRCC Mumbai
On June 25, Sri Lanka Shipping company’s tug, M/V Capricorn, connected to the bow section and commenced towing to the Arabian Gulf. Tugs were never able to connect to the stern section.
mol comfort under tow
mol comfort under tow
mol comfort under tow Haldane van Horen
Image (c) Al Malone
mol comfort under tow Haldane van Horen
Under tow. Image (c) Al Malone
On June 27, the stern section began taking on water and sank with an estimated 1,700 containers and 1,500 metric tons of fuel oil. These photos sent to gCaptain were taken over a five minute period.
IMG_0345
IMG_0350
IMG_0358
IMG_0359
IMG_0361
On July 2, the MOL Comfort’s bow section broke free from its towing wire while in adverse sea conditions. Crews were able to reconnected and continue towing. Four days later, Mitsui O.S.K. Lines reported that on July 6, a fire broke towards the rear of the bow section, and fire fighting efforts commenced.
More MOL Comfort firefighting images and video can be seen HERE
Major-fire-in-s24706
firefighting mol comfort indian coast guard
Image (c) Indian Coast Guard
firefighting mol comfort indian coast guard
Image (c) Indian Coast Guard
Image (c) Indian Coast Guard
Image (c) Indian Coast Guard
firefighting mol comfort indian coast guard
Image (c) Indian Coast Guard
Image courtesy Indian Coast Guard
Image courtesy Indian Coast Guard
mol comfort
image via Ole, gCaptain contributor
mol comfort
image via Ole, gCaptain contributor
mol comfort
image via Ole, gCaptain contributor
mol comfort
image via Ole, gCaptain contributor
mol comfort
image via Ole, gCaptain contributor
In a statement July 10, 2013, Mitsui O.S.K. Lines said that most of the containers on deck have been burnt out, but they have not been able to confirm the situation in the cargo hold. An update said that the bow section sank near 19’56”N 65’25”E (water depth about 3,000m) at 19:00 UTC on July 10 (04:00 on July 11 JST).  The section sank with about 2,400 containers and 1,600 metric tons of fuel oil, MOL has estimated.
MOL Comfort
July 10. Image (c) gCaptain. Click for large.
mol comfort position
Plotted approximate positions of where the MOL Comfort broke apart and eventually sank
FULL COVERAGE: MOL Comfort Incident
MOL Comfort seen in 2009.



Friday, 27 June 2014

Ports increase productivity but Asia may have plateaued (JOC)


Productivity at many ports and terminals increased in 2013, says the Journal of Commerce (JOC) in its yearly report. Asian facilities continue to dominate world rankings but their productivity may have reached a plateau.
Eight of the ten most efficient ports can be found in Asia. Tianjin (China) jumped from fifth place in 2012 to become the most productive port in the world with 130 moves per ship per hour on average in 2013. It is followed by Qingdao and Ningbo (China), Jebel Ali and Khor al Fakkan (United Arab Emirates), Yokohama (Japan), Yantian and Xiamen (China), Busan (South Korea) and Nansha (China).
The proportion is the same for the top ten terminals. APM Terminals Yokohama (Japan) retains its number one position, but is now sharing it with Tianjin Xingang Sinor Terminal, which came second in 2012. Both facilities registered a berth productivity of 163 moves per ship per hour in 2013. They are followed by seven Chinese terminals and two UAE terminals.
The Asian superiority can be attributed to ports and gates being open 24 hours a day, a high level of automation, as well as large transshipment volumes in the region.
Strong performing terminals in 2012 got even better in 2013. Whereas the top ten terminals registered between 97 and 150 moves per ship per hour in 2012, they reached a 119-163 bracket in 2013. “Terminal operators around the world are taking quite seriously the challenge they face to service vessels in port as quickly and efficiently as possible in this era of mega-ships,” says the JOC report.
Productivity improvements are not linked to ground-breaking advances in crane technology or terminal operating systems (TOS), but rather to terminal operators employing more cranes over more shifts – and paying greater attention to operational details.
APM Terminals told JOC that its Yokohama terminal has developed a synchronisation between the vessel and the container yard to avoid wasting time between the quay crane operations and yard equipment operations. The terminal operator has also asked shipping lines to send a detailed cargo-stowage plan before their vessels arrive. APMT says that it uses that information to pre-plan how it will work the vessel so that, by the time the ship docks, the equipment and manpower are in place.
The JOC whitepaper warns that “a steady dose of mega-ships limits the potential for berth productivity gains” in Asia. More than half of the vessel capacity on order is for 10,000 TEU ships or larger. “A looming challenge is how to avoid lost time at berths as ships take up more space and remain in port longer.” The report notes that many berths which used to accommodate three containerships can now receive only two of the new, longer types of vessel.
Whereas there is room for improvement in berth productivity in the United States and Europe, Asia appears to be at its limit, says the report, before quoting Subhangshu Dutt, executive director of Krishnapatnam port in India: “It appears that productivity levels have plateaued, and unless there is a totally new innovative concept with regard to yard design, management and flows, there may not be any significant improvement.” 

Port productivity
2012
2013
1
Qingdao, China
1
Tianjin, China
2
Ningbo, China
2
Qingdao, China
3
Dalian, China
3
Ningbo, China
4
Shanghai, China
4
Jebel Ali, UAE
5
Tianjin, China
5
Khor al Fakkan, UAE
6
Yokohama, Japan
6
Yokohama, Japan
7
Jebel Ali, UAE
7
Yantian, China
8
Busan, South Korea
8
Xiamen, China
9
Nhava Sheva, India
9
Busan, South Korea
10
Yantian, China
10
Nansha, China

Terminal productivity
2012
2013
Terminal
mph

Terminal
mph
1
APM Terminals Yokohama, Japan
150
1
APM Terminals Yokohama, Japan
163
1
Tianjin Xingang Sinor Terminal, China
163
2
Tianjin Five Continents International Container Terminal, China
119
2
Ningbo Beilun Second Container Terminal, China
141
3
Qingdao Qianwan Container Terminal, China
107
3
Tianjin Port Euroasia International Container Terminal, China
139
4
Xiamen Songyu Container Terminal, China
106
4
Qingdao Qianwan Container Terminal, China
132
5
OOCL Kaohsiung Container Terminal, Taiwan
105
4
Xiamen Songyu Container Terminal, China
132
6
APM Terminals Mumbai, India
101
5
Tianjin Five Continents International Container Terminal, China
130
7
Korea Express Kwangyang Container Terminal, South Korea
101
6
Ningbo Gangji (Yining) Terminal, China
127
8
Xiamen Hairun Container Terminal, China
100
7
Tianjin Port Alliance International Container Terminal, China
126
9
Tianjin Port Container Terminal, China
99
8
DP World Jebel Ali Terminal, UAE
119
10
Ningbo Gangji (Yining) Terminal, China
97
8
Khorfakkan Container Terminal, UAE
119

Source and method:JOC collected and computed seven elements provided by ocean carriers representing more than 75% of global capacity. Those data points are: vessel name, terminal name, port city, port country, berth arrival, berth departure and number of moves (including lift-ons, lift-offs and re-stows).
The 2013 study covers 483 ports and 771 terminals.
Productivity is defined as the average of the gross moves per hour for each call recorded last year. Gross moves per hour for a single vessel call is defined as the total container moves (onload, offload and repositioning) divided by the number of hours for which the vessel is at berth.