Felistowe Dockers

Felistowe Dockers

Saturday, 31 August 2013

UPDATE: Firefighters Contain Maersk Kampala Blaze to 6 Boxes


The Maersk Kampala, adrift south of the Suez Canal, for a third day was still fighting a fire that broke out in two containers in the foremost bays on its deck.
The fire began at approximately 21:00 on Aug. 28 while the vessel was heading north towards the Suez Canal.
Maersk Line said all crew are accounted for. No injuries were reported, and communication with the vessel is ongoing. The vessel is fully maneuverable.
Tug boats with fire-fighting capability remain on the scene fighting the fire. An additional fire-fighting team was expected to arrive to help with the effort.
The cause of the fire is still unknown.
Al-Ahram Arabic news Web site reports that 1,600 out of 4,000 containers onboard have been affected, with losses of up to $150 million, though Maersk Line has not confirmed this.
The Maersk Kampala, which was built in 2001 as the P&O Nedlloyd Houtman, has a nominal capacity of 7,070 20-foot-equivalent units.

Maersk Line can confirm that the Maersk Kampala is presently fighting a fire in two containers within the foremost bays on deck. The vessel is fully maneuverable but drifting south of the Suez Canal. All crew are accounted for and no injuries reported and communication with the vessel is ongoing. Tug boats with fire-fighting capability are on the scene fighting the fire. In addition, a fire fighting team will arrive this evening to provide further assistance. Updates will be provided as new information becomes available.

Over the past 14 months, five fires have broken out on board containerships around the world, nearly all of which have resulted in significant, or total loss of the vessel.
In July 2012, containers on board the MSC Flaminia caught fire and exploded in the mid-North Atlantic, killing 3.
In June 2013, a single container on board the Eugen Maersk caught fire near the entrance to the Suez, however the crew was able to extinguish the fire quickly.
In July 2013, the bow section of the MOL Comfort caught fire and ultimately sank with a total loss of all cargo.  That same month, the mixed cargo vessel Hansa Brandenburg caught fire off Mauritius resulting in significant damage to the cargo and the ship’s superstructure.


According to latest Maersk press-release dated Aug 30, fire on board of Maersk Kampala is still on. Tug boats with fire-fighting capability remain on the scene fighting the fire. An additional fire-fighting team was to arrive on the site in the afternoon Aug 30. According to some regional media, fire is by no means small, but there is no confirmation of their reports. There is no AIS signal yet, which is the only proof of possible scale of the fire. If AIS is off because of technical failure, it means fire damaged the bridge. If initially there were two burning containers, later fire obviously spread further, engulfing other containers. Several tugs with powerful water canons should extinguish fire long time ago, be the fire restricted to two containers only.
Fire on board of boxship Maersk Kampala, AIS off, why?
Maersk Line said on Aug 29 13 that the Maersk Kampala was fighting a fire in two containers within the foremost bays on deck. The vessel is fully maneuverable but drifting south of the Suez Canal. All crew are accounted for and no injuries reported and communication with the vessel is ongoing. Tug boats with fire-fighting capability are on the scene fighting the fire. In addition, a fire fighting team was to arrive in the evening to provide further assistance.
Comment:
Let’s hope that the fire is what it is said to be, just two containers in the fore section, but there is something which hints at a more serious situation than described in Maersk statement. Vessel left Jeddah on Aug 27 at 01:24 UTC according to AIS-Satellite, bound for Suez, proceeding at a speed of 16.5 knots. ETA Suez therefore, is about 1300-1400 UTC Aug 29. Vessel should be visible on AIS trackers, but there is no signal since morning Aug 28. As of morning Aug 30, there is still no signal. Vessel should be drifting somewhere off Suez, well in the range of AIS trackers. Assumingly, AIS is off. Why? Either because Maersk just don’t want vessel to be tracked by anyone interested, understandably trying to avoid unwanted publicity, or because AIS system is inoperable. If the latter is the case, it can be explained only by fire being still on, or damages inflicted by hopefully, extinguished by now fire, of a much bigger scale than stated.
Voytenko Mikhail



Firefighting tugs early Monday were making progress toward extinguishing a blaze on the Maersk Kampala, five days after fire broke out in a container in the ship’s forward bay as it steamed toward the Suez Canal, Maersk Line said.
The fire broke out in a single container at the bottom of a stack on Aug. 28, and spread to a “several other containers” in the two foremost bays Friday and early Saturday, when weather conditions prevented the firefighting tugs to get close enough to have maximum effect, the company said.
“Saturday and Sunday saw weather improve and firefighting tugs on scene have been able to continue soaking the area and have managed to reduce the number of containers with fire to six, all contained in the same bays,” Maersk said.
It said firefighting crews aboard the 6,800-TEU vessel are working to extinguish the fire inside containers by cutting open the hot boxes as well as those nearby and flooding them with water.
Another firefighting team was scheduled to board the vessel Monday evening.


ISS appointed port agent for London Gateway


Inchape Shipping Services (ISS) was recently appointed as port agent for the vessel Pictor J which berthed at DP World’s (DPW) London Gateway ahead of the first commercial vessels which will arrive after the official opening in Q4 later this year.
It was the first vessel DPW have brought into London Gateway under their own stewardship and will be used as a training vessel to teach operational skills to the port’s staff.
The Pictor J was welcomed to port by the new harbour master Colin Hitchcock and his deputy James Hannon.
ISS handled all of the container vessel’s arrival formalities as it completed its journey from Germany and will also handle all husbandry requirements over the charter period, including reporting requirements, stores, and crew changes and welfare, as well as acting as the interface between the port and the ship.
ISS also provided port agency for the arrival in March of the giant quay cranes at London Gateway on the heavy-lift vessel operated by Shanghai Zhenhua Shipping Co, the Zhen Hua 26.  These quay cranes, the largest in Britain, are bigger than the London Eye and weigh 2,000 tonnes each.
With an investment of £1.5 billion, London Gateway will combine the UK’s newest deep-sea container port with Europe’s largest logistics park and facilities will include six quays and a total of 24 cranes.



Friday, 30 August 2013

Demonstrating outside DP World's London office yesterday


Many men in suits filming us today, some of which were saluted by security. Suggestion they were from DP World management???. Soon took to their heels when approached for discussion. (3 photos)






Demonstrating outside DP World's London office yesterday, dockers from Liverpool, Immingham, Hull, Grimsby, Felixstowe, Southampton and of course Tilbury. We again call on DP World to give basic human rights to their workers, representation by a trade union.


Unite activists were yesterday protesting outside the London head office of the Dubai-based DP World, owners of the London Gateway, in the continuing row over union recognition at the new deep-sea container port in the Thames Estuary.
The union argues that far from creating jobs, the London Gateway could suck business and jobs from other UK ports, while at the same time undermining the pay and terms and conditions of its workforce due to lack of union recognition.
The demonstration took place between 11am to 3pm outside the DP World Head Office, 16 Palace Street, London, SW1 5JQ.
Unite regional officer Jane Jeffery said: “The protests against DP World’s refusal to recognise the union are continuing and Unite will not rest until workers get their rights recognised. Unite believes that the refusal to recognise the union at London Gateway will mean a race to the bottom in terms of employment conditions.
“We also believe DP World’s behaviour could also threaten the future viability of other container ports. That’s why we were protesting yesterdayand this union is not just going to step aside and allow DP World to ride roughshod over basic labour rights.”









Felixstowe to extend berth 9


Damian Brett | Tuesday, 27 August 2013
The Port of Felixstowe is planning to extend one of its recently opened berths in order to enable it to handle two 18,000 teu ships simultaneously.

The Port of Felixstowe is planning to extend one of its recently opened berths in order to enable it to handle two 18,000 teu ships simultaneously.

The Hutchison Ports UK facility has applied for a harbour revision order that will enable it to extend berth 9 by 190 m as a finger quay.

Felixstowe’s berths 8 and 9 were opened in 2011, adding 1m teu of capacity to the UK’s busiest port. In 2003, at the time of submitting applications for the berths, which were part of the Felixstowe South Reconfiguration project, ships of 18,000 teu were not on the horizon.

“Since 2003, when the original applications for FSR were made, there has been a significant increase in containership dimensions,” the application said.

“In addition, the number of these larger vessels deployed on the key shipping routes calling at the Port of Felixstowe has increased. Consequently the port is experiencing a significant shift in the profile of ships that its customers are seeking to service at Felixstowe and this trend is set to continue.

“Berths 8 and 9 were constructed to provide a two-berth container handling facility. However, it has become apparent that, in order to maintain the capability of the berths to handle two of the largest containerships due to operate in the market from 2013/2014, each of approximately 400 m in length, simultaneously, berth 9 needs to be extended by some 190 m.”

The project requires construction of a new quay wall and dredging alongside the extension to 16 m and approaches to 14.5 m. The proposal has already been approved by the local council.

It is understood that the port hopes work on the project will begin next year and it is estimated that dredging and construction work will take 11 months to complete.

The news comes as the port celebrates handling its 70 millionth teu. To celebrate the milestone, the port arranged for UK Secretary of State for Transport Patrick McLoughlin to load the 70 millionth container on MSC Bettina under guidance of a crane-driving instructor.

Mr McLoughlin said: “I’m proud to help celebrate this milestone for the port — 70m containers is a truly staggering amount and is a testament to the important role Felixstowe continues to play in driving growth.”

Last year, the port handled record volumes of 3.7m teu on the back of 8.8% year-on-year growth.

However, the 1.6m teu London Gateway terminal is set to open in the fourth quarter of the year, adding new capacity and extra competition to the UK’s deepsea terminal industry.

DP World Southampton will add 600,000 teu of new capacity next year as part of a £150m ($233.5m) project.
The extra capacity is already having an impact on the market and several services have switched their UK port of call.


UK's Felixstowe Port Plans Expansion To Handle Super-sized Container Ships




Felixstowe, the U.K.'s biggest container port in terms of capacity, plans to extend one of its berths so it can handle two of the new generation of extra-large container ship at the same time, the latest indication of growing competition among British container terminals for business from owners of the so-called Triple-E vessels.
The port, a unit of Hong Kong conglomerate Hutchison Whampoa Ltd. (0013.HK), applied this month to extend one of its newest berths by 190 meters to handle the new ships.
The vessels are typically 1,300 feet long--equivalent to four soccer fields put end to end--20 stories high and with a capacity of up to 18,000 containers can carry 11% more cargo than the world's biggest current vessels.
The new ships offer potential fuel savings of around 35% over the 14,000-capacity vessels that make up much of the world's current container fleet. But for port operators, they require new infrastructure, including taller cranes to load and discharge the containers, to cope with the new ships.
Felixstowe, which handles about 3.5 million 20-foot containers annually, is in fierce competition with DP World's London Gateway and Southampton ports to attract shipping companies and distribution services.
The port, situated around 113 kilometers north east of London, said in its application to the U.K.'s Marine Management Organisation, that it has seen "a significant increase in containership dimensions."
"In addition, the number of these larger vessels deployed on the key shipping routes calling at the Port of Felixstowe has increased. Consequently the port is experiencing a significant shift in the profile of ships that its customers are seeking to service at Felixstowe and this trend is set to continue," the application said.
Work on the project is expected to start early next year and will be completed in around 11 months.
Felixstowe's decision comes amid a flurry of activity at other U.K. ports.
The London Gateway terminal which is set to open later this year recently announced that U.K. retailer Marks & Spencer would be its first customer, taking up a 900,000 square foot storage facility at the port's logistics park. Southampton has also announced dredging works that will allow it to boost its container-handling capacity by around 600,000 units and berth larger vessels.
"Handling the Triple Es and other large container ships will become a must for European ports if they want to compete," said Lars Jensen, chief executive of Copenhagen-based SeaIntel Maritime Analysis. "In the next few years only ships above 12,000 TEU's [20-foot containers] will operate in the main Asia to Europe trading route."
Danish giant Maersk Line has ordered 20 Triple Es with one ship already in operation. China Shipping Container Lines has ordered five and United Arab Shipping Co. is due to announce its own order this week.



Roll On! Even a Giant Cable Reel Can Freight Using Container Shipping!


UK – EGYPT – Despite the troubles of the past few months’ business goes on across Egypt, as evidenced by the latest project freight consignment shipped by Manchester based logistics group Tuscor Lloyds. With attendance from the forwarding group’s specialist out of gauge team, shipping using a forty foot flatrack container provided the answer, as the giant 29 tonne piece headed out from Aberdeen to service a client in Alexandria.
The single, out of gauge reel, measuring 2.7 x 2.1 x 2.8 metres and destined for a customer in the oil and gas industry, was placed in position on the flatrack with a heavy lift crane before being suitably chocked and secured to the bed using both wire cable and heavy duty ratchet straps. The container base was then placed aboard a step frame trailer for road haulage down to Felixstowe and subsequent loading to a vessel, by way of a dock side crane particularly suited to heavy lift cargoes, for ocean freight out to Egypt.
Tuscor Lloyds Project Cargo Management Team ensured everything required was organised to minimise transit time whilst freighting as containerised cargo, thus also reducing the customers expenditure significantly in comparison to utilising a specialist vessel. The team says the delivery to thePort of Alexandria went smoothly with the goods arriving undamaged and within just thirteen days to the satisfaction of all parties concerned.




New 'bill of rights' for the world’s 1.5 million seafarers


A new “bill of rights,” the International Labour Organization’s (ILO) Maritime Labour Convention (MLC 2006), designed to ensure protection for seafaring workers worldwide and fair competition for shipowners, came into force on 20 August. 

"This is a historic day for the ILO," said its Director-General, Guy Ryder, adding that the MLC 2006 will apply to ships and seafarers representing nearly 60% of the world’s fleet. 

"This is a remarkable achievement. But even more encouraging is that as the rate of ratification keeps gathering momentum, the Convention will, in the next year, cover well over 70% of the world’s ships and seafarers," he emphasised. 

The reference to 2006 is explained by the fact the ILO adopted the Convention in February of that year. 

The MLC 2006 was "a key instrument" for two reasons, Ryder said. Firstly, it seeks to ensure decent work for approximately 1.5 million seafarers around the world who make shipping possible.

Secondly, it provides a level playing field for quality shipowners ensuring that decent working conditions go hand in hand with fair competition. 

"This Convention show how tripartite dialogue and international cooperation can operate constructively for this most globalised of all industries," he said.

It covers areas such as the minimum age of workers, employment agreements, hours of work or rest, payment of wages, on-board medical care, accommodation and food/catering. 

“But of course, our work is not done and I call on all countries with a maritime interest to ratify - if they have not yet done so - and urge governments and shipowners to work effectively to implement this Convention,” he added. 


Thursday, 29 August 2013

Protests continue in London Gateway ‘recognition’ dispute


28 August 2013
Unite activists will be protesting outside the London head office of the Dubai-based DP World, owners of the London Gateway, in the continuing row over union recognition at the new deep-sea container port in the Thames Estuary.

Unite, Britain's biggest union, will highlight the fact that DP World resolutely refuses to recognise Unite.

Unite argues that far from creating jobs the London Gateway could suck business and jobs from other UK ports, while at the same time undermining the pay and terms and conditions of its workforce due to lack of union recognition.

The demonstration will be from 11:00-15:00 on 29 August outside the DP World head fffice, 16 Palace Street, London, SW1E 5JQ.

Unite regional officer Jane Jeffery said: “The protests against DP World's refusal to recognise the union are continuing and Unite will not rest until workers get their rights recognised. Unite believes that the refusal to recognise the union at London Gateway will mean a race to the bottom in terms of employment conditions.

“We also believe DP World's behaviour could also threaten the future viability of other container ports. That’s why we are protesting today and this union is not just going to step aside and allow DP World to ride roughshod over basic labour rights.” 






Protesters seek union status for workers at new superport

UNION members have held a protest in a bid to get representation at the new £1billion London Gateway port in Thurrock.
Unite members demonstrated at the Uniserve depot outside the Port of Tilbury after owners at the new port failed to reach an agreement with the union over whether workers should be given union representation.
Flags were waved and horns were blown as about 30 activists showed their support.
Uniserve is the largest British, privately-owned international freight and logistics company in the UK and has confirmed it is hoping to be part of London Gateway. Europe’s largest logistics park will be adjacent to and integrated with the new port.
Unite argues that far from creating jobs, London Gateway could suck business and jobs from other UK ports, while at the same time undermining pay and other terms and conditions of its workforce.
Unite regional officer Jane Jeffery said: “The protest was aimed at highlighting the fact London Gateway could drain employment and business away from other UK docks.
“Unite believes the refusal to recognise the union at London Gateway will mean a race to the bottom in terms of employment conditions.
“It could also threaten the future viability of other container ports.”
The port is the only major dock in the country that does not have worker representation.
! Claridon, a logistics company based in Stanford-le-Hope, is the latest company to announce it will be using the port, meaning it wouldn’t have to travel to Felixstowe to ship loads.
Meanwhile, it was announced Southern Africa Express Container Service will be docking at London Gateway when it opens later this year.

Fire on board of mega-boxship ZIM Rotterdam, Red Sea updated 31st Aug


Fire occurred on board of mega-boxship ZIM Rotterdam, according to some reports it happened on Aug 23, according to other reports it happened on Aug 27, no other details available. Vessel en route from Port Klang to Felixstowe as of afternoon Aug 28 is drifting of Sokhna, some 20 nautical miles south of Suez, Red Sea.
ZIM Rotterdam, IMO 9398450, dwt 116499, capacity 10062 TEU, built 2010, flag Liberia, manager ZIM INTEGRATED SHIPPING.


ZIM Rotterdam drifting in Red sea, reason unknown
Category :- AccidentsAuthor :- Editorial 
Posted on August 31, 2013, 10:57 pm
On Aug 31 ZIM Rotterdam was actually drifting in northern Red sea since Aug 30, moving around by making tacks at some 2 knots speed.
On Aug 28 vessel was drifting for some time off Egyptian port Sakhna, reportedly for fixing the consequences of the fire, which occurred on Aug 23 or 27. Vessel was en route from Port Klang to Felixstowe. Major General Hassan Fallah, head of the Red Sea Ports Authority, forbade Zim Rotterdam from entering any of the ports on the Red Sea and the Gulf of Suez on Aug 30. He informed the crew of Zim Rotterdam that they were not welcome to enter the Red Sea Ports in South Sinai or the Red Sea Governorate. No explanation given.
On Aug 29 vessel started moving out of Egypt waters and Gulf of Suez at a reduced speed.
Container ship ZIM Rotterdam, IMO 9398450, dwt 116499, capacity 10062 TEU, built 2010, flag Liberia, manager ZIM INTEGRATED SHIPPING.

 



Wednesday, 28 August 2013

Three Maersk container ships are stranded in Bremerhaven since July 14. Update 31st Aug


Three Maersk container ships are stranded in Bremerhaven not since Aug 22, but since July 14, said Emergency Maritime Germany in a press-release published on Aug 26. Vessels are anchored on the road, it is understood that they are not detained, but abandoned by former operator or charterer due to insolvency.
Previous news:
Four Maersk container ships detained on Aug 22
What happened? Four Maersk container ships detained in one day. Is the end of the days somewhere near? Majors are untouchables, or are they not?
Maersk Singapore, IMO 9308649, capacity 8478 TEU, flag Liberia, manager Reederei Blue Star, Hamburg. Detained in Shenzhen, China, on Aug 22, released same day, after fixing emergency systems and fire safety deficiencies.
Three Maersk container ships detained in Bremerhaven on Aug 22, reason unknown:
Maersk Valletta, IMO 9242637, capacity 1719 TEU, flag Gibraltar, manager Kartik Schiffsbetriebs GmbH.
Maersk Vancouver, IMO 9242625, capacity 1719 TEU, flag Gibraltar, manager Kartik Schiffsbetriebs GmbH.
Maersk Vigo, IMO 9242649, capacity 1719 TEU, flag Gibraltar, manager Kartik Schiffsbetriebs GmbH.



Former Maersk vessels in port


The three former Maersk ships that have laid anchored in Bremerhaven but are now being sailed to Wilhemshaven, of which Maersk Vigo and Maersk Valetta have already arrived. They were abandoned by the former Moroccan owner.
The German casualty command has decided to grant the ships berth in Wilhelmshaven. Maersk Vigo berthed yesterday at 1815 hours and a few hours later also Maersk Valetta arrived safely in port. Maersk Vancouver is expected to show up Friday afternoon.

The three ships have sailed ontheir own power, escorted by tugs until they were safely moored. The ships in the harbor area makes it considerably easier and cheaper to bring the meager supplies on board to the crews who are left to themselves, which they have been ever since the previous owner left them behind.

Aside from the ships having previously sailed for Maersk Line, Maersk has nothing to do with them. This, and the fact that they still have Maersk names and are painted in the colours of Maersk Line.


Port of Felixstowe celebrates 70M TEU


Made by our sister site Shipping TV, with video footage from Mark Read: the Port of Felixstowe, the UK's largest container port with a throughput last year of 3.7 million TEU in 2012, celebrated it 70,000,000 TEU with a visit from the UK's Transport Secretary . .






Tuesday, 27 August 2013

DFDS to Invest in New Environmental Technology (Denmark)


Less pollution on Dooley RO / RO Terminal would be good for all of us


Sulphur requirements: In deciding to invest an additional £34.5 million (DKK 300 Million), DFDS is in the process of investing a total of £46 million (DKK 400million,) in new technology that can filter sulphur from ships’ exhaust gases. This is a major step in preparing DFDS for the introduction of new environmental regulations in 2015.
On 1 January 2015, new environmental regulations will come into force which will be of crucial significance to the shipping industry in the Baltic Sea, the North Sea, the English Channel and the entire northern-European transportation network. Under these new environmental regulations, ships operating in these areas will only be able to use oil with a maximum of 0.1% sulphur. Such oil is significantly more expensive than oil with 1% sulphur, which is commonly used today. Fuel prices will therefore become much more expensive and subsequently increase sea transport costs. This could potentially lead to freight being forced onto European roads and result in an increase in road congestion and other environmental problems.
For these reasons, shipping companies have been working hard to find solutions to this challenge. DFDS has decided to invest £34.5 million (DKK 300 Million) in installing scrubbers in eight more of the company’s ships in 2014. A scrubber is an air pollution control device of approx. 70 tons, which can remove sulphur from the exhaust gases produced by ship engines, and the new sulphur regulations allow for alternative solutions that have the same environmental effect as using low sulphur fuel.
DFDS has previously tested a prototype scrubber on a vessel over a period of several years and will this year complete the installment of the new sulphur removal system on three other ships. Thus 12 of our ships will comply with the new environmental regulation, with a total investment of £46 million (DKK 400million,). The installation of scrubbers on another 10 DFDS ships that are compatible with scrubber systems is also being considered.
This means that DFDS is one of the shipping companies leading the way in the preparation for the new environmental regulations.
 Joint effort and transition rules required
CEO Niels Smedegaard of DFDS says: “Society and shipping companies like DFDS have a common interest in improving the environment, while simultaneously ensuring that sea transport does not become unnecessarily expensive, which could lead to an increase in shipments being transported on already congested roads. Our common aim is to maintain routes and jobs in the transport network, which help connect the business community. However, sulphur regulations will make sea transport more expensive from 2015 onwards, and this will affect both the shipping companies and their customers.
Not all shipping companies have the opportunity to make the major investment that a scrubber system requires. In addition, only about half of all ships are suitable for having scrubbers fitted. In reality, the much-discussed LNG (liquid natural gas) is only a solution for new ships.”
He adds: “Therefore we must act quickly to find solutions and, preferably, transition rules for the many ships that are not suitable for scrubber installation, possibly through temporary exemptions, if shipping companies contribute to investments in solutions where possible. Secondly, we have to work together in order to ensure the development of long-term solutions, including clear and appropriate rules for the use of scrubbers and rules that provide companies with a secure basis for deciding on investments. Otherwise, it would be financially irresponsible for shipping companies to make such large investments for the benefit of the environment and infrastructure in Europe,” says Niels Smedegaard.


Monday, 26 August 2013

Cost-Cutting Helps Maersk Line Nearly Double Profit



Maersk Line almost doubled its second quarter profit as above-target cost cuts, buoyed by lower fuel prices, more than offset sluggish growth in container volumes and a double-digit decline in freight rates.
The world’s largest ocean carrier posted a net operating profit of $439 million in the three months through June, against $227 million in the same period in 2012.
A.P. Moller-Maersk said it now expects its container shipping unit’s full year profit to be “significantly above” 2012, compared with an earlier forecast of “above” the $461 million it earned last year.
“Maersk is now an industry leader in terms of profitability,” A.P. Moller-Maersk’s CEO Nils Andersen said.
The carrier has enjoyed a 5 percent competitive margin over its rivals in the past three quarters, according to Andersen.
Maersk’s profit, its fifth consecutive quarter in the black, contrasts with second quarter losses at most Asian carriers. German carrier Hapag-Lloyd posted a profit of 20.9 million euros ($27.6 million) in the second quarter compared with a loss of 7.3 million euro a year earlier, and France’s CMA CGM has yet to publish its results.
The shipping line’s revenue was 9.2 percent lower than a year ago at $6.65 billion, impacted by a modest 2.1 percent rise in traffic to 4.4 million 20-foot equivalent units and a 13.1 percent slump in average freight rates to $2,618 per 40 foot container.
The higher traffic reflected increased activity on short-sea and north-south routes that offset lower volumes on east-west trade lanes.
Andersen said Maersk had cut costs by a “very, very significant” $897 million during the quarter, of which lower fuel consumption accounted for $310 million, while the lower bunker price saved $263 million. Intermodal costs, usually loss-making for the liner industry, were trimmed by $154 million, and a further $120 million savings were made in other areas, including administration, feedering and port calls.
The total cost per 40-foot container fell by 12.7 percent from a year ago to $2,703, mainly driven by vessel network efficiencies.
“Total cost reductions are ahead of plan, especially due to a more cost-effective vessel network compared to last year,” Maersk said.
The carrier now expects global container traffic to grow by 2 to 3 percent in 2013, down from a previous forecast of 2 to 4 percent.
“The outlook for container transportation remains challenging as demand is expected to continue to be weak in 2013 while new deliveries are expected to amount to 9.5 percent of the fleet.”
Maersk said it will respond by maintaining its focus on supply management “such as idling of vessels and blank sailings.”
A.P. Moller-Maersk’s second quarter profit declined 11 percent to $856 million from $965 million a year earlier, reflecting lower crude production at Maersk Oil and a $280 million impairment related to Maersk Tankers’ very-large crude carriers.

Maersk Line has announced general rate increases of between $400 and $500 to transport a 20-foot container from Asia to northern Europe and the Mediterranean, effective Sept. 1.
The Danish carrier said it will charge $400 more for 20-foot containers and an extra $800 for 40-foot containers shipped from Asia, excluding Japan, to northern Europe.
Maersk, which is the market leader on the Asia-Europe trade, also is increasing rates by $500 per 20-foot container and $1,000 per 40-foot container, from Asia, excluding Japan, to the Mediterranean, excluding Syria.
The planned hikes follows similar rate increases by rival carriers, including Hapag-Lloyd and Mediterranean Shipping Co., that will also take effect at the beginning of September.




Sunday, 25 August 2013

Southampton Named Europe’s Most Productive Container Port


ABP’s Port of Southampton has been ranked the most productive port in Europe and the number one performing container terminal in the UK, according to an independent industry study.
Based on confidential data charting more than 100,000 port calls at 400 ports during 2012, the analysis from the Journal of Commerce (JOC) put Southampton’s productivity performance among a global elite.
The findings place Southampton at 20th in the world for productivity, the only port in Europe to feature in the top 20, with an average of 71 container moves per hour. This compares to 49 container moves per hour at the UK’s other major container port at Felixstowe.
The ranking comes as the terminal in Southampton, operated by DP World Southampton, is just over halfway into a four-year improvement programme, using a teamwork approach and new technology to drive performance to new heights. The terminal now operates at rates up to 177 moves per hour on the ultra large container vessels.
The terminal is also the subject of a £150m expansion project designed to ensure it can continue to handle the biggest ships in the world long into the future. As well as an extensive dredging programme, the project sees the construction of a new 500m quay and the installation of four new cranes. The development is on course to open in January 2014.
ABP Port Director Southampton Doug Morrison said: “While it is fantastic to be recognised as the best in Europe, this is just the beginning for Southampton. We have put performance and productivity at the very heart of our operation and we are all committed to driving our service to the next level. I think it is this commitment that gives us the edge. We believe our performance is the key to retaining our existing business and, already this year, this approach has seen us successful in winning new business. There’s been a huge amount of capital investment and hard work from the team here. We are all extremely proud of the reputation for customer service we have built but no one here is under any illusions that we can afford to rest on our laurels. “



Saturday, 24 August 2013

Freight Handling and Warehousing Company Fined £50,000 for Breaching Legislation / Food company fined £16,000



Forklift Striking Ignored Pothole Broke Man's Spine 

UK – A recent prosecution casts a light on a problem which is often present at road haulage depots where vehicles are loaded in open yards which are not properly maintained. Suffolk based transport and warehousing services company, Eagle Freight Terminal Ltd, has been sentenced for a series of safety breaches after a forklift truck toppled and spilled its load onto a worker, breaking his back. The firm was fined a total of £50,000 and ordered to pay costs of £4,501.23 plus £120 victim surcharge after pleading guilty to breaching the Health and Safety at Work Act and failing to comply with two Improvement Notices. 
Ipswich Magistrates' Court heard how on January 9, 2012, 56-year-old Neil Jennings, of Ipswich, was waiting for his trailer to be loaded in the yard of Eagle Freight Terminal Ltd at its Great Blakenham premises when one of the forklifts involved in the loading struck a pothole. The vehicle lurched sideways, shedding its pallets and boxes, one of which hit Jennings. He suffered multiple fractures to the vertebrae of his upper and middle back and was unable to work for several weeks. Jennings can now only undertake light duties and can no longer carry out everyday tasks without pain and discomfort.
The Health and Safety Executive (HSE), an independent watchdog for work-related health, safety and illness, which investigated the incident, found that the freight yard road surface was pitted with potholes and had been the subject of complaints by the company's employees over a significant period. There was little management of traffic movements and no instructions provided regarding segregation of workplace transport and pedestrians.
The court was told that two Improvement Notices were served by HSE on Eagle Freight after the incident requiring them to remedy the condition of the yard's surface and to introduce systems of control which would allow vehicles and pedestrians to circulate safely at the site. Despite two extensions of time to allow the remedial work to be completed, an inspection carried out in September 2012 revealed no work had been completed and neither of the Notices had been complied with. The court also heard that the company had been subject to similar enforcement action by HSE as far back as 2002/3 about the lack of control of workplace transport. After the case, HSE Inspector Paul Grover, said:
"This was an entirely preventable injury caused by persistent disregard by Eagle Freight of basic safety measures. The company allowed the yard's surface to deteriorate so badly that forklift trucks were regularly destabilised when carrying loads. There was also no system to allow vehicles and pedestrians to move safely around each other and the forklift truck driver had not been given suitable training which resulted in him using unsafe work practices where the truck was driven with the forks and load lifted.
"The company's subsequent repeated failure to meet the requirements of the two improvement notices demonstrated their complete disregard for their legal responsibility to keep their employees, and non-employees visiting the site, safe. The risks of serious injury and, all too frequently, death, resulting from the failure to control the safe movement of vehicles and pedestrians are widely recognised. Putting safe working practices in place is often simple and inexpensive and where this doesn't happen the costs, both financial and personal, can be immense."
Photo: A problem which is found wherever forklifts are asked to perform in less than ideal conditions. This shot from a South American haulage yard.


Felixstowe: Food company fined £16,000 for incident which left worker with several fractures



A Felixstowe-based food company was yesterday fined thousands of pounds after one of their workers suffered serious injuries to his right arm when it became trapped in unguarded machinery.

South East Suffolk Magistrates’ Court was told 34-year-old Attila Czege, a Hungarian agency worker, had to take several months off work after the incident at Indo European Foods Ltd on September 20, 2012.
The court heard Mr Czege was working on a production line involved in bagging rice when his right arm became trapped and was dragged in and around a large roller at the end of the conveyor.
He suffered fractures to his upper and lower arm and also had to have surgery three times in two weeks to repair the damage.
A subsequent investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found the conveyor had been at use at the factory since 2006 but had never been properly guarded to safeguard workers against dangerous moving parts.
During a routine inspection in April 2009, the HSE urged the company to install guards on that part of the machine – but a spokesman for the executive said the company “failed to adequately act on this advice”.
Representatives of the firm pleaded guilty to breaching regulation 11 (1) of the Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 and were fined £16,000 yesterday.
Speaking after the case, HSE inspector Saffron Turnell, said: “The risk presented by this conveyor was evident given the working processes involved on the production line.
“The dangers associated with conveyors are well known throughout industry and the guarding of dangerous moving parts is a fundamental element of mechanical safety.
“Conveyors are involved in 30% of all machinery incidents in the food/drink industries and nine out of ten conveyor injuries occur on flat belt conveyors.
“This incident could have easily been avoided as action to guard the machine adequately was quick and inexpensive. It is disappointing that Indo European Foods Ltd failed to satisfactorily heed the earlier advice of HSE.
“Instead, Mr Czege suffered a serious and painful injury which resulted in several months off work.”
In addition to the fine, the firm, which is a food importer and wholesaler, was ordered to pay costs of £910.65 and a victim surcharge of £1,600.

This is the reason that I keep posting about London Gateway not recognising a Union. This is how some Employers treat their workers that do not have a voice in the workplace.