Tuesday, 31 January 2012

World’s Biggest Container Gantries En Route to Wilhelmshaven, Germany


The world’s biggest container gantries are the core of the future EUROGATE Container Terminal Wilhelmshaven, Germany’s only deepwater container terminal.

Four out of the eight container cranes altogether that will go into operation at the first two berths in August 2012 have set sail from Shanghai on a special transporter vessel headed for the German North Sea coast. A second ship with four more gantries on board is to follow soon. Upon completion, a total of sixteen of these giant cranes will be lined up along the 1,725-m-long quay wall of the EUROGATE Container Terminal Wilhelmshaven, allowing four mega container ships to be loaded and unloaded at the same time, 24/7. Thanks to the nautical access route (18 m water depth), geographical location and technical facilities, the EUROGATE Container Terminal Wilhelmshaven – as Germany’s only deepwater port – is ideally suited for handling ULCVs with a load capacity of over 10,000 TEUs.

The route taken by the special transporter ship will pass by Hong Kong, Singapore, via the Indonesian Straits of Sundra, the Cape of Good Hope and through the English Channel to Wilhelmshaven. The steel cranes each weigh around 1,800 tonnes and have a jib length of 69 metres for servicing container vessels with a width of 25 containers on deck. With the jib extended, the EUROGATE cranes project around 125 metres high into the air – the sidelines of a football pitch measure on average 105 metres.

Monday, 30 January 2012

Felixstowe: Warning after lorry shot at with pellet gun on A14


DRIVERS have today been warned to be vigilant after it was believed a lorry on the A14 was shot at with a pellet gun.

The shooting follows recent incidents where vehicles on the dual carriageway have been attacked by people throwing rocks and stones off bridges

In the latest incident, a 53-year-old trucker had just joined the A14 Port of Felixstowe Road from the Dock Gate Two slip road when he heard a loud bang and saw part of his driver’s side window had shattered.

A police spokeswoman said a small hole was made and it’s thought the damage may have been caused by a pellet gun or similar weapon. The driver was uninjured.

The incident happened around 3.10pm on Thursday.

Officers are asking anyone who may have seen anything suspicious in the area or anyone with information about who caused the damage to call 101.

Sunday, 29 January 2012

MAERSK DISBANDS ICON SERVICE


Maersk have announced the disbanding of their ICON service which was launched in March 2011 and operated in conjunction with Safmarine (PRIME 2 Service). It will now be incorporated into the existing Maersk AE1 and AE7 services. The vessels utilised on the ICON service will now be deployed elsewhere and could mean the end of calls at FXT for: Maersk Darlington, Maersk Dauphin, Maersk Dartford, Maersk Madrid, Maersk Miami, Nedlloyd Honshue, and Jervis Bay.

Canada invests in shore power technology


Would be good to have this at Felixstowe.


The Canadian government has announced that it will be investing in shore power technology for Canadian ports.

"This $27.2 million contribution programme will reduce air emissions from ships, protect the environment and health of Canadians and further Canada's economic prosperity," said Denis Lebel, Canada's Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities.

Shore power technology allows vessels to turn off their diesel engines while docked and connected to an electrical power supply at a port facility.

"As we have seen with the success of shore power for cruise ships at Port Metro Vancouver, this programme will also help Canada's tourism sector to take advantage of growth opportunities, increase tourism revenues and create jobs in all regions of Canada," said Wai Young, Member of Parliament for Vancouver South.

According to a press release, the Shore Power Technology for Ports Program builds on Transport Canada's successful Marine Shore Power Program that was introduced in 2007 and concludes this March.

The programme gave Port Metro Vancouver $2 million to install shore power technology at their port for cruise ships and $1.8 million to the Port of Prince Rupert to to install shore power for container ships.

The government added that Canadian Port Authorities and private companies operating in marine ports and terminals in Canada will be able to apply for funding.

The announcement is part of Canada's Clean Transportation Initiative which focuses on aligning Canadian regulations with the United States and with International Standards.

The Initiative also aims to improve efficiency of the transportation system and advance green technologies.

"These initiatives will help Canada achieve its economy-wide target of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 17% from 2005 levels by 2020," concluded the press release.

Friday, 27 January 2012

Strike set to bring Belgian ports to a standstill


Another busy week for Felixstowe

A major provider of maritime services is warning its clients not to attempt to deliver cargo to ports in Belgium on Monday, as a nationwide strike is set to impact all ports and airports, with knock-on effects likely all week.

Inchcape Shipping Services (ISS) said dockers, pilots, tugboat and lock operators would be involved, and that strike pickets would block access roads to ports.

ISS said it had been unofficially informed that port terminals would close from 6am on Monday to 6am on Tuesday.

Patrick Van Huffelen, General Manager at ISS Port Services, said: “We advise shipowners and operators not to attempt to deliver any cargo to Belgian ports on Monday, and we are warning that further disruption to schedules may continue into the week.

Public and private sector workers are striking because they claim their government has made it harder for them to retire early and has cut back on unemployment benefits, as part of an austerity budget aimed at bringing its deficit within the EU limit of 3% this year.

EU leaders are due to meet in Brussels on Monday to discuss budget rules for governments and ways to stimulate growth in the crisis-hit continent.

As part of the strike, aircraft are also likely to be grounded at Brussels Airport, after pilots agreed to take part in the stoppages, trade unions said.

The country’s three main union groupings comprise the ABVV (socialist), ACV (Christian) and ACLVB (liberal).

A spokesman for the private sector union BBTK (affiliated to the ABVV) told IFW: “I think there will be very little activity at the ports.

“We are, like all Europeans, confronted with austerity programmes that only look to small shoulders and ask nothing of the broadest shoulders.

"There have been ample possibilities to negotiate but it’s clear that the government is not willing to negotiate, so we will go ahead with the strike.

Some 50,000 protesters took to the streets of Brussels last month to protest about the cuts.

To: All Port Users


No visitor to the Port of Felixstowe can fail to notice the amount of litter along the verges and central reservation of the A14. Although litter is a national problem, we want to do what we can to address the issue, particularly on the approaches to the port.

The port has worked with other agencies on a number of campaigns to reduce litter, and we are supporting a new campaign led by Suffolk Coastal Services to remind road users not to drop rubbish but to dispose of it responsibly. Motorists and lorry drivers particularly are being targeted with a special campaign which will include two roadside electronic message boards. We will also continue to display similar messages on the electronic signs at dock gates 1 and 2.

The campaign is being backed up with greater enforcement, with over 80 motorists issued with fixed penalty notices since April. Anyone caught dropping any sort of litter can be issued with a fixed penalty notice of up to £80, or risk having to pay £2,500 if taken to Court. The penalties for fly tipping are even stricter, with the upper limit being £50,000 or even imprisonment.

We would be grateful for your help addressing this problem and making Suffolk a nicer place to live and work. A poster has been produced and can be downloaded from:
http://www.portoffelixstowe.co.uk/haulier/documents/Miscellaneous/Suffolk%20Coastal%20litter%20poster.pdf

Thursday, 26 January 2012

Forth Ports takes control at Tilbury


Forth Ports has taken 100% control of Tilbury Container Services (TCS) for £95 million (US$149m) from fellow shareholders DP World and Associated British Ports.

Forth will combine the deepsea and shortsea container facilities at the Essex port of Tilbury into one integrated operation, rebranded London Container Terminal.

The agreement puts the lid on any perceived clash of interests for DP World, which is due to open the new London Gateway container terminal, just down the river, towards the end of next year.

TCS, the closest deepsea container terminal to London, focuses on north-south trades and handles a high volume of reefer cargo, including Australian and New Zealand meat, and butter, cheese and fruit.

It benefited from the trend away from traditional reefer breakbulk shipments of fruit towards the use of reefer containers, and despite the tough economic conditions, turned in a modest 2.5% increase in throughput last year, handling about 320,000 containers.

Tilbury’s shortsea container terminal, next to TCS, saw a 7.5% increase in throughput last year, to 145,000 boxes.

Forth Ports CEO Charles Hammond said: “We are combining two growing businesses which together handle close to 500,000 boxes.”

The rebranded London Container Terminal will become the third largest box facility in the UK, offering a combination of shortsea, deepsea and coastal feeder operations, he added.

Forth Ports acquired its one-third holding in TCS in 1998. It will pay DP World and Associated British Ports close to £48 million each for their shares.

Flemming Dalgaard, DP World MD, Europe & Russia, said: “The offer from Forth made good sense to us and the decision was taken in line with the changing market dynamics in the liner industry, including the rapid escalation in vessel sizes.”

ABP CEO Peter Jones said: “The TCS facility lies within the Forth Ports freehold at Tilbury and it makes absolute sense for this business to be consolidated with Forth’s other container activity.”

Wednesday, 25 January 2012

New package of regulations on European ports in 2013


The European Commission pursues its plan of reviewing by 2013 the legislation applicable to port activities. The future set of measures should ensure that ports are in a position to face new challenges and opportunities right up until 2030.
Commission Work Programme Confirms New Ports Package
The European Commission recently presented its work programme for 2012, which also outlines initiatives planned for 2013 and 2014. The Commission’s new ‘Ports Package’ is mentioned in the 2013 action list. It is referred to as the development of a “framework for future EU ports’ policy, including legislative proposals”. The work programme explains that “this initiative will better enable ports to efficiently handle the increasing freight volumes to enable seamless logistics chains; review the restrictions on provisions for port services and enhance the transparency on ports’ financing, clarifying the destination of public funding to the different port activities with a view to avoid any distortion of competition; and establish a mutually recognisable framework on the training of port workers in different fields of port activities.”

Other initiatives relevant for ports include, in 2012, a legislative proposal to include maritime transport emissions in the EU’s Greenhouse Gas reduction commitment, a review of the Environmental Impact Assessment Directive, the development of a framework on maritime spatial planning, a new rail package and a review of critical infrastructure legislation. In 2013, an EU adaptation strategy for climate change is envisaged, as well as a review of air quality policies, a framework for E-freight and an internal road market package. Environment remains high on the agenda in 2014, with new targets on waste and landfill, an assessment and possible revision of the environmental liability Directive and the set up of a biodiversity strategy.

CMS DeBacker Mathilde Neumann European Union

December 27 2011




The transport white paper published in March 2011 highlighted the need to adopt a suitable regulatory framework in the port sector.

On 8 September, the European Commission Vice-President, Siim Kallas, announced the Commission's intention to bring forward the new package by 2013. The overall objective of the package will be to help ports to remain competitive and support their extensive growth potential.

According to the Vice-President, European ports will face increasing productivity challenges and investment needs, as well as issues surrounding employment and integration into cities. Therefore, the objective is to draft an appropriate legal framework that will enable them to enjoy continued economic prosperity.

In practice, three main objectives will be pursued:

First, the package will aim at ensuring that port services are provided in a competitive and open environment. The restrictions on the provision of port services will therefore be reviewed in the sense of adapting them to the new economic, social and industrial requirements.

The second objective will be an easing of the administrative burden on port activities. Therefore, initiatives such as the blue belt project will be strongly supported. To remind you, the blue belt project aims at enabling short sea shipping companies to operate freely within the internal market by applying simplified administrative procedures.

Last but not least, the third objective of the package is to improve the transparency of port financing in order to avoid distortion of competition and encourage private investors to participate in port projects.

Before submitting the proposal in 2013, the European Commission will first organize a conference on the future of European ports, launch a consultation among the stakeholders and carry out an in-depth assessment of the sector.

Tuesday, 24 January 2012

Fiery start for rates in Year of the Dragon


With the Chinese Year of the Dragon starting yesterday, the average spot rates on the Asia-Europe westbound trade lane witnessed an increase for the fifth week in a row.

However, analysts believe the new year trend will not characterise the year as a whole, and merely reflected European importers moving to secure space on vessels before the week-long factory holiday shutdown.

Rates this week are up by just 0.2% compared with last week, reaching US$982.56 per feu, according to analyst Box Trade Intelligence.

BTI said rates were still below those in the five weeks preceding the Chinese New Year in 2011, but “the week-on-week increases seem to be more promising than last year and more similar to 2010 performances”.

BTI said: “Will 2012 realise similar results to those achieved in 2010, in terms of profit, or are the increases in rates due to the European importers’ anxiety to bring cargo out of China before factory closure for the Chinese New Year?

“Our analyses seem to be more inclined to the second explanation: it is more likely, in fact, that the recent positive results observed in the Asia-Europe trade lane will not characterise the year ahead.

“Although demand from Asia to Europe is increasing, with some shippers experiencing difficulties in accommodating boxes on board at the beginning of the year, load factors are estimated to drop in 2012. In turn, this might cause decrease in rates.”

Monday, 23 January 2012

TURKON LINE


Posted: Mon Jan 23, 2012 2:04 pm Post subject: TURKON LINE


If I understand press announcements correctly, it would appear that we will not see any more Turkon vessels at FXT as they are now taking slots on Seago vessels instead of operating their own vessels into FXT.
Seago are also operating slot agreements with Hamburg Sud and MSC.


Harwich Haven Ships and Yachts Forum Index -> Container News
http://www.turkon.co.uk/news.aspx

New Zealand port of Auckland could be branded first ever port of convenience


The port of Auckland in New Zealand could be declared the first ever port of convenience if management does not put a stop to its savage attack on union rights, the ITF has warned. Workers represented by the ITF-affiliated Maritime Union of New Zealand (MUNZ) have been locked in an escalating dispute over a new collective bargaining agreement.

The MUNZ and Ports of Auckland Limited (POAL) had been close to signing a new agreement, which saw the union agreeing to greater use of a productivity improvement process known as TRACC. However, it has recently been reported that POAL management is now taking the provocative step of attempting to remove the collective bargaining agreement with MUNZ altogether. It is also threatening the whole workforce of some 300 dockers with dismissal if they do not sign up to an agreement imposed by management.

In a letter to Tony Gibson, chief executive officer of POAL, ITF president Paddy Crumlin and ITF general secretary David Cockroft said: “The ITF considers this behaviour as an outrageous attack on basic trade union rights. If this attempt to force workers to abandon their existing agreements continues, the ITF will declare the port of Auckland a ‘port of convenience’ and will request affiliates around the world , particularly in the dockers’ and seafarers’ sections, to take immediate lawful action.”

Sunday, 22 January 2012

Lawyer: Super postpanamax sinking would be a salvage, liability nightmare


THE container industry will be in deep trouble should a super postpanamax container vessel sink, given that the salvage industry and public authorities "barely cope" with the sinking of the 4,688-TEU MSC Napoli in 2007.

That's the warning issued to a gathering of the shipping community in London by Andrew Chamberlain, partner in UK law firm Holman Fenwick & Willan, which specialises in international commerce.

A report by London's Containerisation International said Mr Chamberlain also highlighted other problems, included the "increasingly risk-averse salvage industry which is now in crisis, having few global players and limited and aging resources".

''Shipping will sooner or later face its 'deep-water horizon' moment, and the consequences may well result in a complete change in the accepted liability regimes and even the traditionally accepted insurance arrangements for such large vessels," said Mr Chamberlain.

Saturday, 21 January 2012

The winter months are on the way

Ports must pay more than lip service to safety


A worringly low percentage of port owners, operators and contractors are willing to invest in safety measures, despite acknowledging that a safer port environment directly contributes to reducing costs, according to a new survey from Trelleborg.

The company's barometer survey found that 81% of respondents believed that having a safer port environment directly helps to save money, but only 9% of respondents actually felt that investment should be spent on port safety measures.

Richard Hepworth, managing director at Trelleborg, said to Port Strategy: “The industry is reluctant to invest because of a need for a direct return – it’s much easier to invest in terms of development where there is a clear return.”

The report makes clear that buying cheap is not always the more cost effective option over the lifetime of the job and that the port industry needs to take a longer term view on the issue of safety - rather than on a purely reactive basis.

Trelleborg’s latest barometer report aims to help raise awareness of port owners’, operators’ and contractors’ apparent willingness to cut corners in safety in favour of low cost procurement.
Richard Hepworth, managing director at Trelleborg, said to Port Strategy: “By producing this report, Trelleborg are aiming towards a holistic understanding of our customers’ needs.” But beyond this, there is the greater aim of “improving safety standards across the industry.”

Friday, 20 January 2012

The New World Alliance to Launch New Trans-Atlantic Service


The New World Alliance to Launch New Trans-Atlantic Service
Posted on Jan 19th, 2012 with tags americas, europe, launch, New, News by topic, Service, The New World Alliance, Trans-Atlantic.


The New World Alliance (TNWA) – APL Co. Pte Ltd (APL), Hyundai Merchant Marine (HMM) and Mitsui OSK Lines (MOL) today announced the launch of a new Trans-Atlantic service connecting Europe and the UK with the US East Coast and Panama.

The Americas Europe Express (AEE) service is TNWA’s third dedicated Trans-Atlantic service. It offers multiple weekly sailings from major US and European ports, as well as competitive transit times from Latin America to North Europe via the trans-shipment hub in Panama.

The Alliance will deploy high reefer capacity ships with an average effective capacity of 3,200 TEU. APL will operate three vessels, and HMM and MOL will operate one vessel each.

The AEE service rotation covers the following ports: Manzanillo (Panama), Charleston (US), New York (US), Rotterdam (Netherlands), Bremerhaven (Germany), Felixstowe (UK), New York (US), Charleston (US), and Manzanillo (Panama).

Thursday, 19 January 2012

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MP urges Parliament to unlock ABP’s £150 million investment for Southampton Port expansion


Labour MP calls for unlocking of funds to enable major infrastructure project to goahead
ABP's £150 million investment halted after legal challenge from rival port operator
John Denham, Labour’s MP for Southampton Itchen, has urged the UK government to unlock the £150 million of investment from Associated British Ports (ABP) that is needed for the proposed expansion of Southampton Port.

MP John Denham led a debate in Westminster Hall yesterday on the future of the port in a bid to unlock the funds.

The major infrastructure project has been held up ever since Hutchinson Ports, which owns the nearby Felixstowe, lodged a legal challenge in opposition of Southampton’s plans to redevelop berths 201 and 202 into a new 500m quay wall.

ABP argue that in order for the Port of Southampton to remain competitive with European and UK rivals, it requires the redeveloping of the two existing berths and subsequent dredging to allow access by the latest and largest container ships to the container port.

Mr Denham, said that work must begin in September in order for Southampton to be sure to remain competitive in the years ahead, and accused the Marine

Management Organisation (MMO) of “bureaucratic paralysis” and the Department of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) of “ineffectual complacency”, which has helped to further dealy the project.

Over 800 direct jobs and 1,200 indirect jobs will be safeguarded by the investment and over 200 new full time positions will be created, added Denham.

Yesterday’s debate on the future of the Port of Southampton also gave the opportunity for other local MPs from Hampshire and the Isle of Wight to show their support for the project in Southampton.

“I think we have made real progress,” said Denham. “The Shipping Minister Mike Penning admitted mistakes had been made and he promised that the MMO would have the necessary staff and expertise to deal with the planning application now in order to deal with mistakes of the past.”

“He also sent a strong message to Hutchison Ports, the rival port operators, to back off from any future judicial challenge.”

“There are still plenty of things that can go wrong, but I feel that today’s debate has made a difference and I am grateful to MPs across Hampshire and the Isle of Wight for taking part,” he concluded.

Wednesday, 18 January 2012

Hauliers / Haulage Operators / Port Workers


On behalf of the Highways Agency, all users of the A14 are hereby given prior notice of the following planned road works that may cause some disruption to travel during January:

Major structural works on Hill House Viaduct at Stowmarket - Between Junction 49 & 50 of A14.
Starting Wednesday 18th January, to be completed by end of March 2012.
50mph speed limit in place, average speed cameras and narrow lanes in place 24-hours for road safety reasons.
Off peak overnight road closures (8pm-6am) Eastbound January 23rd & 24th, and Westbound January 25th, 26th & 27th
Overnight diversion along A1120 & A1308 (from A14 Junction 50 to 49 or vice versa)

Carriageway repairs at A14 Wherstead Junction 56 - Westbound only
Starting 26th January, to be completed 30th January at 6am
Night time closures of Westbound A14 8pm-6am for duration of works (4 nights).
Overnight traffic diverted off A14 at J56 exit slip road to rejoin at the same junction
Weekend daytime (28th & 29th January) Westbound carriageway open with single lane closure in place

Both sets of works schedules are weather permitting. Further information can be accessed via the Highways Agency Information Line (HAIL) on 0300 1235000

Tuesday, 17 January 2012

Leading container port is thinking outside the box


By David Ralph, Chief Executive, Haven Gateway

‘Felixstowe: Contain Yourself’. So reads the slogan, alongside the image of a stack of shipping containers, on a T-shirt recently spotted at a trendy on-line clothing shop.

It’s good to know that Felixstowe, as the UK’s largest container port, is getting the recognition it deserves in the most unexpected places!

Containerisation, with its enormous efficiencies, has transformed the global economy over the past few decades. But this is still a world where one size most definitely doesn’t fit all. Not everything will slot into a nice, neat maritime box and, indeed, not everything that goes through Felixstowe is containerised.

Last month (August) was a case in point. Allseas Global Logistics, a specialist in heavy lift and project cargo, turned to Felixstowe when it was contracted to transport a consignment measuring up to 7 metres in height from Scotland to South Korea.

The cargo, involving cement house units and accessories for the offshore industry, was to be shipped out of Felixstowe on board the 9,310 teu Albert Maersk – but road transport from Scotland to Suffolk simply wasn’t possible, given the extreme size and weight of the units. The largest piece measured 4 x 5.9 x 7 metres and weighed 40 tonnes; the entire consignment added up to 174 tonnes and 526 cubic metres.

So, a unique transhipment operation took place. The cargo was transported by coastal barge from Aberdeen to Felixstowe, where it was transhipped across the quay and loaded on to the deepsea vessel.

Normally the cargo might have been routed via Antwerp or Rotterdam, explained Mark Binge, Allseas’ commercial manager. “We tried Felixstowe and they were absolutely brilliant at handling this cargo,” he said. “We will be looking to do this type of operation again via the port.”

Felixstowe has also welcomed another less than box-shaped arrival – Team New Zealand’s Volvo Open 70 yacht, on the deck of the Skagen Maersk.

The yacht’s one-month journey from Auckland involved transhipment at Malaysia for the voyage to Felixstowe. While at the Suffolk port, it was prepared for the round-the-world Volvo Ocean Race, which starts in Alicante, Spain, on October 29. The yacht is due to start a promotional tour from London this week (5 sept).

Although best known as a container port, Felixstowe regularly handles project cargoes and heavy lifts, said Hutchison Ports UK’s CEO, David Gledhill.

“We are continuing to expand the port, which gives us greater flexibility to berth vessels, and with enhanced new handling equipment with up to 100 tonne lift quay crane capacity, the port is keen to develop more out-of-gauge and project business which has previously been routed via the continent,” he said.

When a vessel arrives in port


A little bit more involved than you might think.

So in this month's blog I will consider when a vessel arrives in port.

Historically, a vessel arrives in port when, on voyage-charter, she arrives at the customary anchorage. The Master then tenders Notice of Readiness (NOR).

This basically tells the charterer and, anyone else who is interested, that the vessel is ready, in all respects, to load or discharge her cargo. Effectively it is the end of the sea voyage and this is when the port stay starts. This is important as the charter party will stipulate who is responsible for charges, payment and services (lay time and demurrage).

Nowadays, the customary anchorage can be widely interpreted and provides a good topic for the lawyers! For example: a loaded super tanker may end her sea voyage miles from the customary anchorage and the pilot will board by helicopter. Similarly, if there is a berth ready, the vessel may proceed directly to the berth and not go to the anchorage. We will find that even in this day of instant communication, a lot of the laws date back to the old days where communications were not always efficient.

Now we have arrived we have to 'enter in' and to be 'cleared in'.

A vessel is entered in when the Customs authorities have the following:


•ship’s particulars - including provisions, stores and fuel;

•record of previous voyages;

•crew list and list of personal effects;

•passenger list, if any; and

•cargo manifest.

We will also need to comply with the requirements of the International Ship and Port Facility Security Code (ISPS Code).

This then allows the authorities to process the ship and, as one can imagine, it can take anything from minutes to days. Minor infringements of procedural requirements can lead to grossly disproportionate fines or informal settlements depending upon the country.

We can also inspect visits from recognised authorities such as:

•The harbour Master;

•Port State Control inspectors;

•Port Health; and

•Customs officials;

The vessel is then cleared in when the authorities are satisfied that everything is in order.

Again, due to instant communication, a vessel can be entered and cleared in almost immediately. Some countries have automated systems, and trading blocs, such as the European Union, have their own requirements.

The key person in making sure that a vessel completes her port stay as efficiently as possible is the agent. The Master will have been in regular contact with the agent, advising them of the vessel’s estimated time of arrival and asking for any other services, such as:


•fuel (commonly known as bunkers);

•fresh water;

•stores;

•provisions;

•crew changes;

•any surveys that have to be completed by:

◦the Flag administration;

◦the classification society;

◦the P&I club; and

◦third party surveys.

So we now have the first relationship, that between the Master and his agent.


In the next blog I will consider the topic of pilots and pilotage.
Alasdair Adamson
Director of Marine Risk Management Ltd. (UK)

Monday, 16 January 2012

Norway: SinOceanic Shipping Takes Delivery of VLCV MSC Vega


SinOceanic Shipping ASA, took delivery of Very Large Container Vessels (VLCV) MSC Vega (13,100 TEU) today and she is placed on a 15 year charter with MSC, the 2nd largest container line in the world.

The second vessel (“MSC Altair”) will be delivered in late February 2012, and the third vessel (“MSC Regulus”) in April 2012. Upon delivery, both of these vessels will also be placed on 15 year charters with MSC.

The three vessels, together with YM Portland, a 4.400TEU vessel presently owned by the Company, will generate a total gross freight income of approximately USD 1 billion over the course of the Charter periods, with an EBIDTA of USD 60 million per year.

As previously communicated, the agreed purchase price for each vessel is approximately USD 155 million, of which a total of approximately USD 62 million has already been paid as partial consideration prior to delivery. The USD 62 million pre delivery and deposit installments paid for the three new vessels have been financed by way of shareholder loans from the sponsor and largest shareholder in SINO, Oceanus International Investment AS. (“Oceanus”). Oceanus is owned by HNA Group Co. Limited, China (“HNA”) which is the ultimate owner of 33.33% of the shares in the Company.

The remaining part of the purchase price for the vessels which falls due on delivery, and the refinancing of the loans from Oceanus (HNA), was intended to be financed by raising new debt and equity.

Due to the present challenging times in the world’s equity markets, the Board of the Company has decided that the Company should postpone entering the equity markets to raise capital to finance the delivery of the new vessels provided that alternative financing is available. An equity raising now, even if it could be successfully achieved, would be dilutive to existing shareholders of the Company, as the terms and conditions at this time would be particularly onerous.

As a consequence, “MSC Vega” is financed by a USD 80 million eight years senior secured loan facility arranged by Deutsche Bank AG and a subordinated loan of USD 80 million from Oceanus (HNA). The subordinated loan has a tenor of 8 years and carries a margin of 8% over Libor the first year and 10% over Libor the remaining 7 years. No upfront fee has been charged. The loan from Oceanus (HNA) is without recourse to the Company. The loan will be re-financeable and it is the Company’s intention to seek to re-finance this loan once the equity markets normalise. In the meantime, however, the financial benefits which would otherwise accrue for the benefit of shareholders will be required to service debt obligations. Oceanus (HNA) has confirmed that it intends to continue its support of the Company as far as possible so that it can fulfill its contractual obligations.

In addition, senior debt commitments of a total of USD 160 million from major international shipping banks are in place to finance the debt portion of the remaining two vessels upon delivery.

With the support of Oceanus (HNA), the Company will therefore be positioned to grow going forward once markets normalise in accordance with the original plan communicated to the shareholders earlier in the year provided that it is able to procure the equity portion or similar alternative financing for the acquisition of “MSC Altair” and MSC Regulus”.

Mega ship glut makes Asia-Europe overcapacity trap inescapable


OVERCAPACITY on Asia-Europe trade lanes looks like an inescapable trap because of the glut of mega ships that are too big to go anywhere else, say analysts.


Containerships are losing money on Asia-Europe route after slashing rates more than 50 per cent this year because of a rate war and overcapacity with 42 of the world's biggest newbuildings joining the mega ship glut, reports Bloomberg.


Shipping lines have cut capacity on Asia-Europe routes to revive rates, with Hapag-Lloyd, Maersk and Mediterranean Shipping Co (MSC) announcing US$250 per TEU increases.


But these may not significantly boost rates, said Johnson Leung, head of regional transport for Jefferies Group in Hong Kong, because only 10 per cent of capacity has been cut against 15 per cent on the transpacific.


Alphaliner and Clarkson data show that next year's 13,000-TEU ships will nearly double that launched in 2011 and boost the mega fleet to 100 ships to be devoted to Asia Europe because they are too big for US ports, said the report.


MSC and its new partner, Marseilles-based CMA CGM, will add the most tonnage in 2012, with 21 new ships, increasing their combined fleet to 49. Asian lines will have 26 similar ships by 2013, leaving them reliant on smaller vessels ships to face the MSC-CMA group and Maersk, together representing half of the Asia-North Europe capacity.


"The alliance is going to put a lot of the Asian players at a huge disadvantage. There is no way they will be able to match it. Shipping lines have taken steps to reduce capacity, but it is not enough. They need to make drastic cuts or it's only going to get worse with all those new ships coming next year," said Um Kyung, Seoul-based analyst at Shinyoung Securities.


Said another Seoul-based analyst, Jee Heon Seok, at NH Investment & Securities: "It's getting tough for Asian lines on a trade that is dominated by the Europeans. There's not much choice at the moment other than reducing capacity to give them a better chance of raising rates."


Spot rates per TEU from Asia to Europe have dropped to US$490, the lowest since the Shanghai Shipping Exchange started tracking data, as a flood of new ships outpaces demand for Asian-made goods. The breakeven point on the route is at least $700, according to Morgan Stanley.


Maersk, the world's biggest container shipping line, has taken advantage of the twenty-three 13,000-TEU plus ships it operates to help set up a daily service on Asia-Europe routes, offering the industry's only guaranteed shipping times. Maersk expects a loss in containers this year, but nonetheless will add twenty 18,000-TEU vessels in 2013. These ships, the world's biggest, will have an estimated 26 per cent per-box cost advantage over the largest vessels now used on Europe lanes.


Among Asian lines, only China Cosco and China Shipping operate ships with capacities bigger than 13,000 TEU. This reflects a greater focus on transpacific routes by carriers in the region.






More Asian lines are set to begin operating mega-ships next year. Hanjin, a partner of Cosco, will get five vessels bigger than 13,000 containers, according to Clarkson data. Cosco will double its fleet of that size to eight vessels. The two lines also work on Asia-Europe routes with United Arab Shipping, which will increase its mega ship tally to nine from one by the end of 2012.






Hyundai Merchant Marine Co will also add its first five mega-ships next year. Its partner Singapore's APL will get its first ship of that size in 2013 and is receiving ten 10,000-TEU vessels. The shipping lines' other partner MOL won't get its first mega ship until 2013 at the earliest.

Saturday, 14 January 2012

Felixstowe: Burger queen Sam’s in Landguard limbo


But today, Samantha Dorling’s 11-year tenure at the Crows Nest, a burger van located at the ship viewing area, is looking more and more uncertain.

As plans take shape for the new Landguard visitor centre, which will incorporate a restaurant with views out to sea, Mrs Dorling, 44, fears she will be evicted from her beloved site.

But until plans are confirmed her future is up in the air. “I wish they would tell me because I need to get on with my life,” she said.

“You have got to remember that between now and Easter the weather down here is pretty rough and, to be honest, the reason I stand here all winter is to keep the customers happy.

“I don’t want to be here all winter just to be kicked out in April.

“I have been here for 11 years and I have built this business up and everyone knows us here.

“I just really want to know – it’s all very unsettling.”

Mrs Dorling, who lives in Great Bentley near Clacton, first knew about the plans in 2006 and set up a book for her customers to sign to say how much they wanted the Crows Nest to stay.

Since then hundreds of people have signed the book and she believes it is an example of how loved the business is and also how close all her customers are.

She said: “People are mortified that they are just going to get rid of us.

“We are like a family here and I just hope whoever gets the cafe understands the people.”

The new visitor attraction at Landguard, paid for by the Port of Felixstowe, will include a 58-seater restaurant with panoramic views over the harbour. It is hoped this could in place by next summer.

Suffolk Coastal District Council, who are dealing with the planning permission, have refuted Mrs Dorling’s claims that she has not been informed of what is happening at Landguard.

A council spokesman said: “The planning application has now been submitted to the council and a decision on it is likely in the next few weeks.

“If it is approved, then a timescale for developing the new facilities will be drawn up and finalised.

“The council has been keeping the owner of the Crows Nest, who has a licence, as fully informed as possible of what is being planned.”

Felixstowe High Street In Decline




Sad to see that Candlers, one of Felixstowe’s longest established retailers, is closing on the owners retirement – but it does mean that there’s a shop-full of traditional , high-quality furniture on sale at half it’s previous retail price.
I assume that this means that the premises themselves will soon be up for sale, too. It is a very large site, complete with upper floor, large warehouse and car/truck parking at the rear, and I think it would be ideally place for a town-centre Wetherspoons – I keep telling them we could do with one of their food pubs in town!

Another very “Felixstowe” shop to go is the long-established Bonnet’s cafe . . its been a very popular venue for the town’s ladies who lunch, and rather a lot of them did . . .
The notice in the window says that the business has been closed due to a combination of ill-health and declining business.
I rather suspect that some of the town’s lunchers have found the attractions of Chris Dane’s Corner Cafe, just across the road, rather too tempting – its sometimes hard to find an empty table at busy times of the day, which demonstrates that he has got both his sums right, and his food and hospitality offering right, too.
It’ll be interesting to see where the rest of Felixstowe retail population goes during the remains of this winter and spring. Shop owners seem to have done quite well, compared to some other towns, but our percentage of vacant premises has certainly risen in the past few weeks . .

And finally?
Yes, sorry, I’m still fed-up with this one – the piece of Felixstowe’s prime shopping estate that is closed as a shop but still run as an office by Oxfam, right in the centre of Hamilton Road.
I’m not very sure of the position of this kind of premise. Oxfam ran it as a shop, but closed it down in that role a couple of years ago. Since then, its been used as some kind of internet marketing centre or similar, not open to the public, and with the window crudely papered over. The paper has now come off, but it isn’t any more attractive than before.
I’d be very glad to see some town or district councillor, or the district council, take a closer look at this one. Do Oxfam have the right to take a retail shop out of retail use? Have they converted it into an office use without permission?

http://www.felixstowenews.tv/

Hamburg Sud, Seago Line Enhance Cooperation Between North Europe and Eastern Mediterranean


With the aim of providing significantly more cost-efficient services, Hamburg Süd and Seago Line announce that they are to enhance their cooperation in the trade between North Europe and Eastern Mediterranean. Both lines had responded to unfavourable market developments in this trade in August 2011 by combining their services.

Starting in January 2012, the currently existing four services of both partners are to be rationalised and replaced by a new service concept featuring three loops.

The ‘Israel Loop’ will see the deployment of four Seago Line Panmax vessels of 4,200 TEU (nominal) each. The port rotation is: Rotterdam – Felixstowe – Bremerhaven – Antwerp – Haifa – Alexandria – Ashdod – Rotterdam

The ‘Levant Loop’ will be operated with five Hamburg Süd Panmax ships, each featuring a nominal capacity of 4,200 TEU and calling at the following ports: Felixstowe – Antwerp – Hamburg – Tangier – Limassol – Alexandria – Port Said – Beirut – Lattakia – Mersin – Port Said – Algeciras – Felixstowe

The two previously mentioned loops will be augmented by the ‘Inner Med Feeder’, which will be operated with the following port rotation: Tangier – Algeciras – Alexandria – Mersin – Port Said – Ashdod – Haifa – Salerno – Valencia – Tangier

The combination of these three loops provides fast transit times, a comprehensive port coverage and facilitates the deployment of larger, cost-efficient vessels. The new service configuration further allows connections to the global liner networks of both companies, whereby the established schedule reliability of the partners guarantees a continued very high standard of service.

Hamburg Süd completes its service package between North Europe and Eastern Mediterranean with the ‘Turkey Service’, which retains the port rotation: Felixstowe – Bremerhaven – Antwerp – Gebze – Kumport – Gemlik – Aliaga – Valencia – Felixstowe

Yang Ming to order five 8,000-TEU ships, but divided on 16,000-TEUers


TAIWAN's Yang Ming Marine Transport Corp's board of directors have given the green light to order five new 8,000-TEU ships for N$591.6 million (US$19.65 million) that was placed earlier by subsidiary All Oceans Transportation.

The board also agreed to issue N$7 billion in new debts for paying back old debts.

But the company remains divided whether to proceed with an order for five 16,000-TEU giants, after chairman Frank Lu submitted a proposal concerning the purchase to the board for discussion, reports the Taipei Times.

The board of Taiwan's second-largest container shipping firm did not reach a decision on the exact number of ships to be ordered, when to place an order, how to obtain the ships or even the size of the vessels, the report said.

Said Yang Ming CFO Vincent Lin: "The board has shown support for the plan after hearing our briefing on shipbuilding trends and the competitive advantage of mega containerships."

But the company is in no rush to reach a conclusion on the potential order as it still needs some time to research and observe the market, Mr Lin said.

The five new ships on order are scheduled for delivery in the next two years and will be registered as national ships, the company said.

In addition, the company's board also agreed to sell three 3,600-TEU vessels, possibly next year.

Friday, 13 January 2012

The Strolling Stevedores


My story
We are a group of six stevedores ( Ian Gow , Gary Newson, Nick Lord, Trevor Cable, Mel Jacobs, John Mundy.) who work at the Port of Felixstowe. We are travelling to Tanzania on 23rd January 2012 to attempt to climb to Uhuru peak at the top of Mt Kilimanjaro. At a height of 5895 metres (19340 ft) it is the highest mountain in Africa. We will be taking the Rongai route on a trek which will last 7 days, we hope to reach the summit on the 6th day. Temperatures will range from 30° at the start to possibly -25° at the summit. We are raising money for St Elizabeth Hospice in Ipswich which is a local independent charity. The trip has been totally self financed and all money raised will go directly to the hospice. Thanks for any sponsorship through this website and also to those who have sponsored us on our sponsorship forms. Every penny really does count! THE PHOTO'S ON THIS WEBPAGE WERE TAKEN BY HENRY STEDMAN OR CMK WHO OWN THE COPYRIGHT ON THEM

http://www.justgiving.com/strolling-stevedores

hi everyone
For anyone who might be interested in tracking our group up Kilimanjiro.


Glad we caught up today below is the page of tracking our progress on the mountain.

www.teamkilimanjiro.com
Point to home on bar on left and see drop down menu, top option.
track a climber
next page on right click track a climber now
We are code name- TRCA(HS) x6
Walking 26th to 1st
good luck i went straight to it.

Just in case i havent caught up with you we are a team of 6 portworkers calling ourselves the strolling stevedores are attempting to climb kili next week.
We have financed the climb ourselves and fund raising for St elizabeths hospice a local charity for local people.
If you havent donated to this worthy cause and would like to go to the website just giving and type the name trevor cable in the middle box as the link onto us.
Thank you to all of you who have given already by email or just giving.

Thursday, 12 January 2012

MSC boosts use of rail freight


Shipping line MSC has renewed its contract with UK intermodal rail freight operator Freightliner, increasing the number of containers sent by rail each year.

The renewed contract is an expansion of a service already moving 30,000 containers a year.

The increase in volumes will remove more than 6,000 additional lorry journeys from the UK’s congested road network.

The deal follows the transfer of MSC’s services at the port of Felixstowe to the newly developed, state-of-the-art Berths 8 and 9.

Freightliner MD Adam Cunliffe said; “The contract helps to support the additional capacity MSC is providing through the new berths 8 and 9 at Felixstowe that are able to support the new generation 14,000teu containerships.”

He said the service would be operated by Freightliner’s new PowerHaul locomotives that can pull longer trains, “enabling increases in container volumes with reduced CO2 emissions”.

Wednesday, 11 January 2012

London Gateway 'a massive threat' to Felixstowe



A senior executive at the UK port of Felixtowe has warned that it will face its “biggest threat in years” when the rival London Gateway terminal opens next year.

Referring to the “changing competitive landscape on the horizon”, Hutchison Ports (UK) Port Development Director Andrew Harston told guests at Felixstowe’s community reception that DP World’s new container port had taken “a very major step towards becoming a reality” with the announcement that contracts had been let and an opening was planned in the fourth quarter of 2013.

He said: “London Gateway will be the biggest threat that we have seen to our business for many, many years and we are going to have to look very closely at everything we do to ensure that we are providing port users with the best possible service.

“If we do this, we can limit the impact on the port and the local economy – but we shouldn’t fool ourselves that it will be easy.”

He said: “We can do it, though. We are better located, closer to the main shipping lanes, have better rail connections than they will be able to offer and we don’t need to navigate the M25 to get everywhere.”

However, he said, what DP World would have “in spades” and where Felixstowe was “comparatively weak”, was warehousing and logistics facilities near the port.

“We shouldn’t sell ourselves short – we have a lot to offer port users – but this is an area we need to look at.”

On a positive note, Felixstowe remained very committed to developing its business and this year would push ahead with the construction of another new rail terminal on the port, said Harston.

The New North Rail Terminal will be located behind Trinity Terminal and the first in the UK designed to handle longer, 30-wagon trains.

Felixstowe remains the UK’s largest container port and its new deepwater Berths 8 & 9, officially opened last September, also put the port in a good position to compete for traffic into the future, he added.

Diana Containerships buys two APL boxships


Second deal in a month lifts Greek owner’s growing fleet to nine

DIANA Containerships has bought two container vessels from NOL in a deal including two-year charters back to boxline APL.

The Greece-based, Nasdaq-listed boxship specialist said it will pay $30m each for the 1995-built APL Sardonyx and the 1996-built APL Spinel, both of 4,750 teu capacities.

Each vessel will earn a daily rate of $24,750 from the APL charters. They are to be delivered within the first quarter of this year.

The charterer has an option applying to each vessel for a third year at the same rate and thereafter an option for a further year a rate of $28,000 per day.

For the minimum periods, the employment of the two vessels should add $33.5m to the company’s gross revenues, Diana estimated.

The deal is the second of two raids either side of the festive period which have lifted Diana Containerships’ fleet to nine vessels.

Just before Christmas, the Greek owner confirmed a deal to purchase two 3,750 teu units, Cap San Marco and Cap San Raphael, from Hamburg Süd at a price of $33m each.

The agreements included three-year charters back to the German operator.

Analysts hailed that deal as a boost for Diana and there was also a positive reception for a new revolving credit facility for up to $100m lined up with Royal Bank of Scotland.

Chairman and chief executive Simeon Palios said that within six months of a June 2011 public offering the company “succeeded in putting that money to work with the acquisition of good ships from reputable liner operators with very lucrative time charters attached from their respective sellers.”

The company said it intends “to continue to capitalise on investment opportunities by purchasing additional containerships”.

Kesgrave: Inquest is opened into death of man, crushed at Ipswich Docks


AN INQUEST into the death of a man at Ipswich docks has been opened and adjourned, police have today confirmed.


Neville Wightman died of crushing injuries after an incident at the docks on December 16.

The 52-year-old, of Penzance Road in Kesgrave was unloading rigging at work when he was crushed by a section of floating pontoon at the port in Cliff Road.

Greater Suffolk cororner Dr Peter Dean opened and adjourned the inquest into Mr Wightman’s death yesterday.

Tuesday, 10 January 2012

Criminal damage to vehicles A14 Trimley - update


10 January 2012

Suffolk Police have identified and formally interviewed two boys in relation to stones being thrown from a main road and damaging vehicles.

The incidents happened near to a bridge on the A14 at Trimley St Mary on Thursday 15 December.

The two boys both aged 8 years and from the Felixstowe area have been interviewed by officers and both admitted their involvement in objects being thrown at vehicles.

Thirteen vehicles including an ambulance were damaged in total.

Detective Superintendent Stuart Sedgwick who has been leading an investigation into a number of similar incidents which have occurred on major trunk roads in the county said: "We were shocked to discover that the incidents in Trimley St Mary on 15 December had been committed by boys of such a young age. We are confident that these two were responsible for the reported incidents from that day and we will now be working with the boys, their parents and the youth offending service to ensure the boys are educated about the dangers and consequences of their actions."

Police and partners, including the county council, borough and district councils, Fire and Rescue Service, Ambulance Service and Highways Agency, are working together to deal with a number of incidents of objects being thrown from bridges over key routes in Suffolk and enquiries are ongoing.

Motorists travelling on the main routes through Suffolk are being asked to report any suspicious activity.

Posters are being placed at a number of bridges over the A14 and A12 bearing the message: Spot Anything Suspicious? Call 999.

The posters also have a bridge reference number, which motorists can quote to help the police arrive quickly on scene.

Saturday, 7 January 2012

Hanjin Shipping: stock post is not for sale



A larger stake in the world's ninth largest container shipping line Hanjin Shipping will not be on the market after all.




There have been rumors of a sale of the Hanjin Group's post for around 10 percent in Hanjin Shipping as the company had sold its small stake in Hanjin Group.

The Korean stock law dictates that companies must own less than 3 percent of each other to be separated. Therefore, people have speculated that a major sale was on his way, writes Tradewinds.

But Hanjin rejects that be the plan.

Source: Finansnyheder

Cannabis seized at British port


About £4.8 million ($7.3 million) worth of Cannabis have been seized by border control officers at the British Port of Tilbury, the BBC has reported.

According to reports, the 1.7 tonnes of drugs came from Cuba and were hidden inside a shipping container carrying molasses.

The container arrived via Jamaica and Rotterdam, the UK Border Agency said.

"It is not unusual for smugglers to hijack perfectly innocent shipments in the hope that they will evade detection, but our border officers are alert to these criminals' modus operandi," Goff Hicks, the agency's assistant director at the port told the BBC.

"This is a major detection that has not only prevented a sizeable quantity of harmful drugs from hitting the UK's streets, but also dealt a big financial blow to the smugglers."

According to reports, so arrests have been made.

The port used equipment including x-ray scanners to find the illegal goods hidden inside the containers.

Maersk Line slashes idle time with a new twist


New fully automatic twistlocks enable the latest Maersk Line vessels to offload containers as soon as they are secured in port. They are Maersk Line's latest tool to meet the shipping company's ambitious on-time delivery target of 95%.

Maersk Line has implemented the new, fully automatic twistlocks to its new fleet of container vessels after eight years of development and testing.

"With the fully automatic twistlocks we can start discharging containers as soon as the vessels are secured. We save between 20 and 50 minutes," says Brian Lund Andersen, Port and Terminal Efficiency Manager at Execution Operation, Maersk Line.

The fully automatic twistlocks, like other twistlocks, latch containers together so they remain locked at sea. Contrary to the semi automatic twistlocks, they don't have to be unlocked manually by terminal workers, the so-called stevedores, when arriving in ports.

Instead, with the new twistlocks, the containers are released by the cranes' vertical pull thereby obviating the time-consuming unlocking done by stevedores.

"We improve our terminal performance giving us a time buffer that will have a positive impact not only on our on time delivery, but also on our ability to steam slower resulting in bunker savings," explains Brian Lund Andersen.

Maersk Line has tested the fully automatic twistlocks on the container vessel Maersk Bali for a year with a reduction in time spent in ports. As a result of the positive tests, all new Maersk Line vessels are equipped with fully automatic twistlocks, including the SAMMAX- and WAFMAX-vessels which were launched earlier this year. The 14 S-class vessels bound for maintenance will also be equipped.

Maersk Line is currently investigating the potential for a wider "retrofit" to existing vessels.

Friday, 6 January 2012

Drewry forecast bleak outcome for 2011 despite container growth of 6.5%


Drewry Maritime Research, the London-based shipping consultants, claims that the shipping industry could lose as much as US$5.2 billion in 2011.

Despite a projected global container growth of 6.5 percent, Drewry found that by analyzing figures from the third quarter of 2011 and end of year industry dynamics, last year was a year to forget for container lines.

Continued vessel overcapacity, poor headhaul growth on the major east-west routes and the continued fight for market share amongst the lead players ensured that spot rates eroded by more than 50% on the key headhaul routes by the end of 2011, said Drewry.

Drewry also noted that despite attempts in the final months of the year by ocean carriers to reduce capacity on a number of services, spot rates failed to rise by a significant margin. However, Drewry state that rates are expected to rise as we approach the Chinese New Year.

The major task that shipping lines face in 2012 is ensuring that they remain competitive on slot costs with the introduction of larger vessels on all key trade routes. With Maersk introducing its new “Daily Maersk” service on the Asia-Europe trade lanes in November, a number of ocean carriers have joined forces, including CMA CGM and MSC, to share costs and services to provide a competitive alternative. The service structures will be finalised by April 2012, although many carriers will continue to receive big ships throughout the rest of this year. With three major groupings in place, the remaining small players with sub 8,000 TEU ships will find it extremely difficult to survive in this intense environment, according to Drewry.

In 2012, the world’s shipping fleet with a capacity above 8,000 TEU will increase by 25 percent. This growth will serve as a huge challenge for the industry, with Drewry forecasting decent demand growth only in the emerging markets of Latin America, Indian Subcontinent, Africa and intra-Asia, where vessels with a capacity below 8,000 TEU are operational. Overall global demand growth for 2012 is forecasted at 5.4 percent, according to Drewry.

With a number of shipper contracts being signed on the Asia-Europe trade in 2012 for about $1,100 per 40ft all in, levels that are below break-even, sustained revenue increases will be scarce as the current supply/demand fundamentals on the key east-west trades are not strong enough, note Drewry.

“We believe that at the current burn rate, carriers’ cash reserves will run out during the second half of 2012. If they do not put a substantial amount of tonnage into lay-up by this time, the consequences could be dire,” comments Drewry’s head of container research, Neil Dekker.

Alhtough vessels from suspended services are being deployed on alternative routes, Drewry also estimate that the number of ships being layed up or idled could reach 8 percent of the entire global fleet, equal to nearly 1.4 million TEU.

“Carriers will at some stage in 2012 be forced to idle tonnage, even if the lead players are showing no inclination to do so at the moment. This will enable a partial recovery in spot rates during the second half of this year,” added Dekker.

“In the meantime, the industry will continue to change its structure as all stakeholders adapt to the difficult conditions. We still do not foresee any company acquisitions, as was the case in 2009 and consolidation is more likely to happen through the disappearance of small players.”

Breaking News: More rocks thrown from A14 bridge at Trimley


Motorists travelling on the main routes through Suffolk are being asked to report any suspicious activity following a series of incidents in which objects have been thrown from road bridges.

Posters are being placed at a number of bridges over the A14 and A12 from Monday (January 9), bearing the message: Spot Anything Suspicious? Call 999.

The posters also have a bridge reference number, which motorists can quote to help the police arrive quickly on scene.

They are the latest response by the emergency services, local councils and the Highways Agency who are working together to tackle the issue.

Extra patrols are taking place in areas around bridges on the key routes in the county - and an investigation lead by a detective superintendent has been launched to catch those responsible.

Suffolk's County Policing Commander, Chief Superintendent David Skevington, said:

"Our investigations are continuing into these incidents - and motorists using the key route network in Suffolk could provide us with important information.

"Hopefully, these signs will prompt motorists who see anything suspicious to get in touch immediately, after finding a safe place to stop and make a call to us.

"We are taking these crimes extremely seriously. Fortunately, no one has been injured in these incidents - but it goes without saying that throwing anything from a bridge onto a busy road has the potential to result in road traffic collisions causing serious injury - or even death."

The signs have been provided by the Highways Agency.

Dave Gingell, Highways Agency Regional Director in the East, said: "Safety on our roads is our top priority and we are doing everything we can to assist Suffolk Police in bringing these dangerous and irresponsible activities to an end.

"Arrangements are being made for the new posters to be put in place on 31 bridges crossing the A14 and A12 early next week and we would urge members of the public to report any suspicious activities to the Police without delay."


Police Direct Team

Thursday, 5 January 2012

NORCAPE IPSWICH FERRY


The NORCAPE has ended her days and is now on the beach at ALIAGA in Turkey.
Here is a video of the view from her bridge on her final approach to the beach.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GEwWEwRmihY&fb_source=message
NORCAPE used to sail from Ipswich to Rotterdam for many years for the P&O North Sea ferry service, so was passing through the harbour everyday.

London Gateway appoints Meaby to senior management


London Gateway has hired Clive Allen as finance director, Victoria Tobin as human resources manager, and has promoted Charles Meaby to commercial director, all of whom are local to the port.

The firm says about two-thirds of its staff are from the local area and that this proportion is set to increase as it hires thousands more staff in the build up to opening the deep-sea port in Q4 2013.

Meaby has been promoted from London Gateway’s general management, and in his new role will lead the commercial, property and communication teams to establish London Gateway as a significant UK national port and logistics hub.

He joined DP World in 2005 with some 15 years experience in port development. Meaby previously worked for Associated British Ports and Hutchison Port Holdings in the UK and overseas where he held senior management positions in general management, commercial and business development.

Allen has over 20 years experience in the shipping industry, most recently with P&O Containers and the Maersk group. He was involved in the launch of products such as P&O Nedlloyd’s Pacific Trade and held full profit and loss responsibility for the multi-billion dollar company.

While with Maersk, Allen was in charge of finance in the UK and financial controller for all inland terminal activities within APM Terminals.

Tobin is a member of the Chartered Institute of Personnel Development. She has over 20 years experience in HR working in the pharmaceutical and retail sector with companies including Tesco, Makro, and Waymade Healthcare.

Wednesday, 4 January 2012

Job Security


“Dockers’ unions remain in a strong position despite the crisis because employers and governments need skilled port labour to run efficient ports. This labour is especially important in times of recovery and future economic growth.”


Dockers are working in a highly competitive industry where employers are constantly seeking to increase profits and cut costs. The global economic downturn has put an even sharper focus on greater efficiencies and saving money in the short term. These actions have a direct impact on dockers’ job security as operators seek to reduce their costs by casualisation of the workforce. In many ports registered, trained and experienced labour is being replaced by unskilled, casual and unskilled labour, often provided by sub-contractors.

At the same time, the global network terminal operators are seeking to expand by opening new terminals, taking full or part ownership of publicly owned terminals or bidding for concessions as ports are privatised. We want to ensure that cost-cutting and privatisation do not threaten port and dock workers’ job security, terms and conditions, trade union rights and safe working practices. We emphasise the importance of long-term skilled labour to the safe and efficient running of ports.

Health & Safety


“Any injury in our industry must be avoided, and serious injury and death is unacceptable. All accidents and industrial diseases are preventable with the right safety culture, the right management approach to safety, the right workforce approach to safety and the right tools in the hands of employers and the workforce.”
Paddy Crumlin, ITF President and Chair of the Dockers’ Section




The Health and safety of dockers and other port workers can potentially be compromised when employers seek to reduce costs or privatise their operations; ITF unions will fight to stop this happening. The health and safety of men and women port workers can be threatened when casual or untrained labour don’t follow health and safety best practice, also when they work for long hours or without adequate breaks, dealing with increased workloads as employers seek to do more work with less people. Inadequate or unsuitable safety equipment, clothing or procedures is also a danger. Training for all port workers is essential and the ITF is campaigning to win acceptable training standards in ports around the world to ensure the highest standards of health and safety possible are guaranteed.

The International Cargo Handling and Coordination Association says that “31 and 40 percent of all injuries at container port facilities occur aboard ships during lashing operations.” The ITF has influenced health and safety codes at an international level – read on to learn how.

Rena starts to break up



Grounded containership in NZ splits in two



The Liberian-flagged containership Rena that grounded on a New Zealand reef almost three months ago has, effectively, broken into two pieces, New Zealand’s shipping authority said yesterday.

The Rena still has hundreds of cargo containers on board and has been hit by heavy swells and rough weather for the past four days.

A statement from Maritime New Zealand (MNZ) yesterday said the 47,000-tonne vessel was “effectively in two pieces, but is still firmly grounded on the reef and may be still joined underneath.”

It added: “Divers will examine the undersides once weather and sea conditions improve, probably today.”

The operation to remove the containers remains suspended until conditions improve further.

The statement said nine containers had been “misplaced,” possibly crushed in a hold or lost overboard, while two had definitely gone overboard, one of which was found.

“Light oil sheens have still been seen coming from the bow and stern of the ship. An unknown quantity of oil remains on the ship. Salvors will continue to monitor the state of the Rena,” said the statement.

“Storm conditions have washed up debris on to the beaches, but no significant fresh oil has been reported,” it said.

The Rena ran aground on the Astrolabe Reef, off the east of the north island, near the port of Tauranga, on 5 October, causing one of New Zealand’s worst environmental disasters.

The captain and navigation officer from the ship’s Filipino crew have been charged in connection with the grounding and the resulting pollution.

Tuesday, 3 January 2012

Government must stop mega-trucks coming to UK


Campaigners are warning that 25-metre mega-trucks weighing up to 60 tonnes could become the norm on UK roads if the government does not oppose new European proposals to allow them to cross borders.

The European Commission is proposing changes that would allow mega-truck traffic between consenting countries.

The current UK limits for lorries are 16.5 metres and 44 tonnes, but the government recently approved a 10-year trial of 18.5 metre lorries, which is due to start this month.

Campaigners argue that once European mega-trucks are allowed to travel between member states, large UK haulage companies will claim they are unfairly disadvantaged and pressurise government to allow them to operate 25-metre 60-tonne vehicles on UK roads.

Philippa Edmunds, Freight on Rail Manager, said: “The UK government must oppose the EC proposals now, otherwise in reality, it will not be able to resist them in the future.

“The impact of lorries two metres longer has not even been assessed yet, let alone of an additional eight metres.

“Allowing mega-trucks will lead to more road fatalities, more congestion and more pollution and will be disastrous for the rail freight industry, which has the potential to take thousands more long-distance lorry journeys off the road.”

She added: “Bringing mega-trucks to the UK could also cost the taxpayer dearly.

“Mega-trucks are 50% longer and a third heavier than existing HGVs. The cost of adapting road infrastructure, such as strengthening bridges, is likely to run into billions. In Austria, a much smaller country than the UK, adaptation costs have been estimated at €5 billion.